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Migration As A Way To Diversify: Evidence From Rural To Urban Migration In The U.S

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  • Mohammad Arzaghi
  • Anil Rupasingha

Abstract

type="main"> This paper extends the utility maximization model of migration by introducing income and unemployment-related uncertainties as determinants of utility, and analyzes the effects of the informational advantages of migrants. The paper maintains that migration would expand an individual's economic choices and opportunities and allow diversification. Consequently, diversification advantages influence the location decisions of migrants, an effect captured by the correlation of incomes at the origin and potential destinations. We use the discrete choice model based on random utility maximization as the framework for our empirical investigation of migration from the United States rural to urban counties. This paper takes advantage of an equivalent relation between the conditional logit model and Poisson regression to study the migration decisions using aggregate data among a large set of spatial alternatives. The results show that the diversification concerns have significant effects on location decisions of the rural-urban migrants in the United States.

Suggested Citation

  • Mohammad Arzaghi & Anil Rupasingha, 2013. "Migration As A Way To Diversify: Evidence From Rural To Urban Migration In The U.S," Journal of Regional Science, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 53(4), pages 690-711, October.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:jregsc:v:53:y:2013:i:4:p:690-711
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    Cited by:

    1. Paolo Veneri & Vicente Ruiz, 2016. "Urban-To-Rural Population Growth Linkages: Evidence From Oecd Tl3 Regions," Journal of Regional Science, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 56(1), pages 3-24, January.
    2. Anil Rupasingha & Yongzheng Liu & Mark Partridge, 2015. "Rural Bound: Determinants of Metro to Non-Metro Migration in the United States," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 97(3), pages 680-700.
    3. repec:bla:presci:v:96:y:2017:i::p:s113-s134 is not listed on IDEAS
    4. Mojgan Hatami & Abu Hassan Abu Bakar & Nurwati Badarulzaman, 2013. "Impact of Migration on Housing Prices: A Case of Low-Income Households in Iran," Acta Universitatis Danubius. OEconomica, Danubius University of Galati, issue 9(1), pages 28-35, February.
    5. Vicente Royuela, 2015. "The role of urbanisation on international migrations: a case study of EU and ENP countries," International Journal of Manpower, Emerald Group Publishing, vol. 36(4), pages 469-490, July.
    6. Tripathi, Sabyasachi & Kaur, Hardeep, 2017. "Determinants of Rural to Urban Migration in Large Agglomerations in India: An Empirical Analysis," MPRA Paper 76484, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    7. Yigit Aydede, 2017. "Immigration and location choices of native-born workers in Canada," Papers in Regional Science, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 96, pages 113-134, March.
    8. Ludo Peeters & Coro Chasco, 2016. "Identifying local determinants of destination choices of international immigrants to the Madrid metropolitan area," Papers in Regional Science, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 95(2), pages 281-307, June.

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