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Wealth Distributions of Migrant and Australian-born Households

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  • DENISE DOIRON
  • ROCHELLE GUTTMANN

Abstract

Wealth is an important measure of overall economic well-being and a crucial factor in migrants' ability to integrate into their new country. Using data from the 2002 HILDA survey, this study explores the disparity between the wealth distributions of native-born and foreign-born households in Australia. Using quantile regressions the results reveal that migrants have significantly less wealth than their Australian-born counterparts throughout the wealth distribution. This is despite the greater wealth-generating characteristics of the foreign-born. The wealth differentials are reduced but still negative for the migrant cohorts who have been in Australia for over 25 years. Copyright © 2009 The Economic Society of Australia.

Suggested Citation

  • Denise Doiron & Rochelle Guttmann, 2009. "Wealth Distributions of Migrant and Australian-born Households," The Economic Record, The Economic Society of Australia, vol. 85(268), pages 32-45, March.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:ecorec:v:85:y:2009:i:268:p:32-45
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Gatina, Liliya, 2016. "Does money buy happiness? Financial and general well-being of immigrants in Australia," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics), Elsevier, vol. 63(C), pages 91-105.
    2. Mosfequs Salehin & Robert Breunig, 2012. "The immigrant wage gap and assimilation in Australia: the impact of unobserved heterogeneity," CEPR Discussion Papers 661, Centre for Economic Policy Research, Research School of Economics, Australian National University.
    3. Robert Breunig & Syed Hasan & Mosfequs Salehin, 2013. "The Immigrant Wage Gap and Assimilation in Australia: Does Unobserved Heterogeneity Matter?," The Economic Record, The Economic Society of Australia, vol. 89(287), pages 490-507, December.
    4. Asadul Islam & Jaai Parasnis & Dietrich Fausten, 2013. "Do Immigrants Save Less than Natives? Immigrant and Native Saving Behaviour in Australia," The Economic Record, The Economic Society of Australia, vol. 89(284), pages 52-71, March.

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