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The distributive effects of education: an unconditional quantile regression approach

  • Alejo, Javier
  • Gabrielli, Florencia
  • Sosa Escudero, Walter

We use recent unconditional quantile regression methods (UQR) to study the distributive eects of education in Argentina. Standard methods usually focus on mean effects, or explore distributive effects by either making stringent modeling assumptions, and/or through counterfactual decompositions that require several temporal observations. An empirical case shows the exibility and usefulness of UQR methods. Our application for the case of Argentina shows that education contributed positively to increased inequality in Argentina, mostly due to the effect of strongly heterogeneous effects of education on earnings.

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Paper provided by University Library of Munich, Germany in its series MPRA Paper with number 42933.

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Date of creation: 2011
Date of revision: 2012
Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:42933
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Web page: http://mpra.ub.uni-muenchen.de

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  1. Melly, Blaise, 2005. "Decomposition of differences in distribution using quantile regression," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 12(4), pages 577-590, August.
  2. Martins, Pedro S. & Pereira, Pedro T., 2004. "Does education reduce wage inequality? Quantile regression evidence from 16 countries," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 11(3), pages 355-371, June.
  3. José Mata & José A. F. Machado, 2005. "Counterfactual decomposition of changes in wage distributions using quantile regression," Journal of Applied Econometrics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 20(4), pages 445-465.
  4. Card, David, 2001. "Estimating the Return to Schooling: Progress on Some Persistent Econometric Problems," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 69(5), pages 1127-60, September.
  5. Sergio Firpo & Nicole M. Fortin & Thomas Lemieux, 2007. "Unconditional Quantile Regressions," NBER Technical Working Papers 0339, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  6. repec:cup:cbooks:9780521845731 is not listed on IDEAS
  7. repec:cup:cbooks:9780521608275 is not listed on IDEAS
  8. Buchinsky, Moshe, 1994. "Changes in the U.S. Wage Structure 1963-1987: Application of Quantile Regression," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 62(2), pages 405-58, March.
  9. Walter Sosa Escudero & Sergio Petralia, 2010. "“I Can Hear the Grass Grow”: The Anatomy of Distributive Changes in Argentina," CEDLAS, Working Papers 0106, CEDLAS, Universidad Nacional de La Plata.
  10. Javier Alejo, 2006. "Desigualdad Salarial en el Gran Buenos Aires: Una Aplicación de Regresión por Cuantiles en Microdescomposiciones," CEDLAS, Working Papers 0036, CEDLAS, Universidad Nacional de La Plata.
  11. Koenker, Roger W & Bassett, Gilbert, Jr, 1978. "Regression Quantiles," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 46(1), pages 33-50, January.
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