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The Cyclical Dynamics and Volatility of Australian Output and Employment

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  • DAVID SHEPHERD
  • ROBERT DIXON

Abstract

In this paper, we examine the volatility of aggregate output and employment in Australia with the aid of a frequency filtering method. This analysis is compared with more traditional methods based on the examination of first differences in the logs of the raw data. We show that the application of univariate AR and bivariate VECM methods to the data results in a detrended series which is dominated by noise and gives break points which are not robust to alternative decomposition methods. When we apply a frequency filtered procedure we find that the detrended series is dominated by cyclical rather than noise variation. We find evidence of a sustained reduction in the cyclical volatility of both the gross domestic product and employment series in 1993–1994, not in 1984. We also find that there is a clear association between output volatility and employment volatility.

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  • David Shepherd & Robert Dixon, 2008. "The Cyclical Dynamics and Volatility of Australian Output and Employment," The Economic Record, The Economic Society of Australia, vol. 84(264), pages 34-49, March.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:ecorec:v:84:y:2008:i:264:p:34-49
    DOI: 10.1111/j.1475-4932.2008.00445.x
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    Cited by:

    1. Afşin Şahin & Aysit Tansel & M. Hakan Berument, 2015. "Output–Employment Relationship Across Sectors: A Long- Versus Short-Run Perspective," Bulletin of Economic Research, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 67(3), pages 265-288, July.
    2. David Shepherd & Rebeca I. Muñoz Torres & George Saridakis, 2019. "Monetary policy rules with PID control features: evidence from the UK, USA and EU," International Review of Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 33(6), pages 737-755, November.
    3. David Shepherd & Robert Dixon, 2008. "The Cyclical Dynamics and Volatility of Australian Output and Employment," The Economic Record, The Economic Society of Australia, vol. 84(264), pages 34-49, March.
    4. Robert Dixon & David Shepherd, 2013. "Regional Dimensions of the Australian Business Cycle," Regional Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 47(2), pages 264-281, February.
    5. David Shepherd & Robert Dixon, 2010. "The not-so-great moderation? Evidence on changing volatility from Australian regions," Department of Economics - Working Papers Series 1090, The University of Melbourne.

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    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • E32 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Prices, Business Fluctuations, and Cycles - - - Business Fluctuations; Cycles
    • E37 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Prices, Business Fluctuations, and Cycles - - - Forecasting and Simulation: Models and Applications
    • E52 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Monetary Policy, Central Banking, and the Supply of Money and Credit - - - Monetary Policy
    • C22 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Single Equation Models; Single Variables - - - Time-Series Models; Dynamic Quantile Regressions; Dynamic Treatment Effect Models; Diffusion Processes
    • C32 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Multiple or Simultaneous Equation Models; Multiple Variables - - - Time-Series Models; Dynamic Quantile Regressions; Dynamic Treatment Effect Models; Diffusion Processes; State Space Models

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