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Work‐from‐home productivity during the COVID‐19 pandemic: Evidence from Japan

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  • Masayuki Morikawa

Abstract

This study examines the productivity of working from home (WFH) practices during the COVID‐19 pandemic. The results reveal that the mean WFH productivity relative to working at the usual workplace was about 60%–70%, and it was lower for employees and firms that started WFH practice only after the spread of the COVID‐19 pandemic. However, there was a large dispersion of WFH productivity, both by individual and firm characteristics. Highly educated and high‐wage employees tended to exhibit a small reduction in WFH productivity. The results obtained from the employee and employer surveys were generally consistent with each other.

Suggested Citation

  • Masayuki Morikawa, 2022. "Work‐from‐home productivity during the COVID‐19 pandemic: Evidence from Japan," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 60(2), pages 508-527, April.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:ecinqu:v:60:y:2022:i:2:p:508-527
    DOI: 10.1111/ecin.13056
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    Cited by:

    1. Daiji Kawaguchi & Sagiri Kitao & Manabu Nose, 2022. "The impact of COVID-19 on Japanese firms: mobility and resilience via remote work," International Tax and Public Finance, Springer;International Institute of Public Finance, vol. 29(6), pages 1419-1449, December.
    2. Abrardi Laura & Grinza Elena & Manello Alessandro & Porta Flavio, 2022. "Work From Home Arrangements and Organizational Performance in Italian SMEs: Evidence from the COVID-19 Pandemic," Working papers 076, Department of Economics and Statistics (Dipartimento di Scienze Economico-Sociali e Matematico-Statistiche), University of Torino.

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