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Gender Inequality In Education In China: A Meta-Regression Analysis

Author

Listed:
  • JUNXIA ZENG
  • XIAOPENG PANG
  • LINXIU ZHANG
  • ALEXIS MEDINA
  • SCOTT ROZELLE

Abstract

type="main" xml:lang="en"> Although there is evidence that there was gender inequality in China's education system in the 1980s, the literature in China has mixed evidence on improvements in gender inequality in educational attainment over the past three decades. Some suggest gender inequality is still severe; others report progress. We seek to understand the progress China has made (if any) in reducing gender inequality in education since the 1980s. To meet this goal, we use a meta-analysis approach which provides a new quantitative review of a relatively large volume of empirical literature on gender educational differentials. This article analyzes differences across both time and space, and also across different grade levels and ethnicities. Our results indicate that gender inequality in educational attainment still exists, but it has been narrowing over time. Moreover, it varies by area (rural versus urban) and grade level. There is nearly no significant gender inequality in the case of girls in urban areas or in the case of the 9 years of compulsory education (primary school and junior high school). Girls, however, still face inequality in rural areas (although inequality is falling over time) and when they reach high school or beyond. (JEL I24)

Suggested Citation

  • Junxia Zeng & Xiaopeng Pang & Linxiu Zhang & Alexis Medina & Scott Rozelle, 2014. "Gender Inequality In Education In China: A Meta-Regression Analysis," Contemporary Economic Policy, Western Economic Association International, vol. 32(2), pages 474-491, April.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:coecpo:v:32:y:2014:i:2:p:474-491
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Dai, Fengyan & Cai, Fang & Zhu, Yu, 2018. "Returns to Higher Education in China: Evidence from the 1999 Higher Education Expansion Using Fuzzy Regression Discontinuity," IZA Discussion Papers 11735, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    2. Hongwei Xu & Yu Xie, 2017. "Socioeconomic Inequalities in Health in China: A Reassessment with Data from the 2010–2012 China Family Panel Studies," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, vol. 132(1), pages 219-239, May.
    3. Cui, Ying & Liu, Hong & Zhao, Liqiu, 2019. "Mother's education and child development: Evidence from the compulsory school reform in China," Journal of Comparative Economics, Elsevier, vol. 47(3), pages 669-692.
    4. Alice Evans, 2017. "Urban change and rural continuity in gender ideologies and practices: Theorizing from Zambia," WIDER Working Paper Series 061, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
    5. Sandeep Mohapatra & Bruno Wichmann & Philippe Marcoul, 2018. "Removing The “Veil Of Ignorance”: Nonlinearities In Education Effects On Gender Wage Inequalities," Contemporary Economic Policy, Western Economic Association International, vol. 36(4), pages 644-666, October.

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    JEL classification:

    • I24 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Education and Inequality

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