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Designing Pollution Market Instruments: Cases Of Uncertainty




"This paper examines design alternatives for emissions trading credits and assesses their relative performance given several sources of uncertainty endemic to market-based environmental regulatory programs. Facilities regulated in such programs face significant uncertainty about their total emissions. Uncertainty arises due to changes in production-demand schedules for their product, imperfect knowledge of abatement efficiency, and other informational lags. Depending on the design of the trading credit, this uncertainty can result in significant market price volatility and undesirable increases in peak emissions (in the absence of additional costly market institutions, such as contingent contracts and brokered insurance). In addition to the design alternatives, the paper considers allocation alternatives to alleviate these unintended effects and also discusses the value of properly designed reconciliation markets". Copyright 1994 Western Economic Association International.

Suggested Citation

  • Dale A. Carlson & Anne M. Sholtz, 1994. "Designing Pollution Market Instruments: Cases Of Uncertainty," Contemporary Economic Policy, Western Economic Association International, vol. 12(4), pages 114-125, October.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:coecpo:v:12:y:1994:i:4:p:114-125

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Ledyard, John O. & Szakaly-Moore, Kristin, 1994. "Designing organizations for trading pollution rights," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 25(2), pages 167-196, October.
    2. Montgomery, W. David, 1972. "Markets in licenses and efficient pollution control programs," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, vol. 5(3), pages 395-418, December.
    3. Thomas H. Tietenberg, 1980. "Transferable Discharge Permits and the Control of Stationary Source Air Pollution: A Survey and Synthesis," Land Economics, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 56(4), pages 391-416.
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    Cited by:

    1. Li, M.W. & Li, Y.P. & Huang, G.H., 2011. "An interval-fuzzy two-stage stochastic programming model for planning carbon dioxide trading under uncertainty," Energy, Elsevier, vol. 36(9), pages 5677-5689.
    2. Stephen P. Holland & Michael R. Moore, 2012. "When to Pollute, When to Abate? Intertemporal Permit Use in the Los Angeles NOx Market," Land Economics, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 88(2), pages 275-299.
    3. Sovacool, Benjamin K., 2011. "The policy challenges of tradable credits: A critical review of eight markets," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 39(2), pages 575-585, February.
    4. Holland, Stephen P. & Moore, Michael R., 2013. "Market design in cap and trade programs: Permit validity and compliance timing," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 66(3), pages 671-687.
    5. Creti, Anna & Villeneuve, Bertrand, 2008. "Equilibrium Storage in a Markov Economy," MPRA Paper 11944, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    6. John Tisdell & Daniel Clowes, 2008. "The problem of uncertain nonpoint pollution credit production in point and nonpoint emission trading markets," Environmental Economics and Policy Studies, Springer;Society for Environmental Economics and Policy Studies - SEEPS, vol. 9(1), pages 25-42, March.
    7. Godby, Robert W. & Mestelman, Stuart & Muller, R. Andrew & Welland, J. Douglas, 1997. "Emissions Trading with Shares and Coupons when Control over Discharges Is Uncertain," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 32(3), pages 359-381, March.
    8. Akira Maeda, 2004. "Impact of banking and forward contracts on tradable permit markets," Environmental Economics and Policy Studies, Springer;Society for Environmental Economics and Policy Studies - SEEPS, vol. 6(2), pages 81-102, June.
    9. Sovacool, Benjamin K., 2015. "The political economy of pollution markets: Historical lessons for modern energy and climate planners," Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews, Elsevier, vol. 49(C), pages 943-953.
    10. Hennessy, David A. & Roosen, Jutta, 1999. "Stochastic Pollution, Permits, and Merger Incentives," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 37(3), pages 211-232, May.
    11. repec:dau:papers:123456789/5384 is not listed on IDEAS
    12. Chen, C. & Li, Y.P. & Huang, G.H., 2013. "An inexact robust optimization method for supporting carbon dioxide emissions management in regional electric-power systems," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 40(C), pages 441-456.
    13. repec:dau:papers:123456789/2280 is not listed on IDEAS

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