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Work Pressure in Europe 1996-2001: Trends and Determinants

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  • Duncan Gallie

Abstract

Diverse theories have predicted a trend towards growing work pressure in advanced capitalist societies, while pointing to quite distinct causal factors. This paper seeks to assess these arguments using data from two surveys of employees in European Union member-states carried out in 1996 and in 2001. It finds there is no evidence of a trend towards higher work pressure over this period. There is, however, support for some of the main arguments about the types of factors that affect work pressure: for instance, skill, job control, new technology and current job security are clearly important. But the trends in job control and job security have not been those predicted, while changes in another major determinant - the length of working hours - have tended to reduce work pressure. There are substantial and relatively stable differences in work pressure between countries, but to a considerable extent, these reflect compositional differences with respect to the main determinants of work pressure. Copyright Blackwell Publishing Ltd/London School of Economics 2005.

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  • Duncan Gallie, 2005. "Work Pressure in Europe 1996-2001: Trends and Determinants," British Journal of Industrial Relations, London School of Economics, vol. 43(3), pages 351-375, September.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:brjirl:v:43:y:2005:i:3:p:351-375
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    File URL: http://www.blackwell-synergy.com/doi/abs/10.1111/j.1467-8543.2005.00360.x
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Gallie, Duncan & White, Michael & Cheng, Yuan & Tomlinson, Mark, 1998. "Restructuring the Employment Relationship," OUP Catalogue, Oxford University Press, number 9780198294412.
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    Cited by:

    1. Clark, Andrew E., 2009. "Work, Jobs and Well-Being across the Millennium," IZA Discussion Papers 3940, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    2. Böckerman, Petri & Bryson, Alex & Ilmakunnas, Pekka, 2012. "Does high involvement management improve worker wellbeing?," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 84(2), pages 660-680.
    3. Mohammad Iranmanesh & Suhaiza Zailani & Soroush Moeinzadeh & Davoud Nikbin, 2017. "Effect of green innovation on job satisfaction of electronic and electrical manufacturers’ employees through job intensity: personal innovativeness as moderator," Review of Managerial Science, Springer, vol. 11(2), pages 299-313, March.
    4. Helen Russell & Frances McGinnity, 2014. "Under Pressure: The Impact of Recession on Employees in Ireland," British Journal of Industrial Relations, London School of Economics, vol. 52(2), pages 286-307, June.
    5. Dr Alex Bryson, 2009. "How Does Innovation Affect Worker Wellbeing?," National Institute of Economic and Social Research (NIESR) Discussion Papers 348_1, National Institute of Economic and Social Research.
    6. Andrew E. Clark, 2009. "Work, jobs and well-being across the Millennium," Working Papers halshs-00566139, HAL.
    7. Russell, Helen & McGinnity, Fran & Kingston, Gillian, 2014. "Gender and the Quality of Work: From Boom to Recession," Research Series, Economic and Social Research Institute (ESRI), number BKMNEXT264.

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