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Consumer Interest in Environmentally Beneficial Chicken Feeds: Comparing High Available Phosphorus Corn and Other Varieties

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  • Pesek, John D., Jr.
  • Bernard, John C.
  • Gupta, Meeta

Abstract

One source of phosphorous pollution in areas of high chicken production is runoff from fields using fertilizer from these operations. A potential solution is to feed chicken high available phosphorus (HAP) corn, reducing phosphorus in manure. This study examined consumer purchase likelihood of chickens fed HAP, created traditionally or through genetic modification, and other genetically modified (GM) corn including Bt and Roundup-ready. Survey results from the Delmarva Peninsula found considerable interest in non-GM HAP corn, although GM HAP corn was not typically viewed as more acceptable than other GM varieties. Overall, the marketplace appears open to products geared toward environmental benefits.

Suggested Citation

  • Pesek, John D., Jr. & Bernard, John C. & Gupta, Meeta, 2011. "Consumer Interest in Environmentally Beneficial Chicken Feeds: Comparing High Available Phosphorus Corn and Other Varieties," Journal of Agricultural and Applied Economics, Southern Agricultural Economics Association, vol. 43(04), November.
  • Handle: RePEc:ags:joaaec:117945
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    File URL: http://purl.umn.edu/117945
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Huffman, Wallace E. & Shogren, Jason F. & Rousu, Matthew C. & Tegene, Abebayehu, 2003. "Consumer Willingness to Pay for Genetically Modified Food Labels in a Market with Diverse Information: Evidence from Experimental Auctions," Journal of Agricultural and Resource Economics, Western Agricultural Economics Association, vol. 28(03), December.
    2. Bonham, John G. & Bosch, Darrell J. & Pease, James W., 2004. "Cost Effectiveness Of Nutrient Management And Buffers: Comparisons Of Four Spatial Scenarios," 2004 Annual meeting, August 1-4, Denver, CO 20069, American Agricultural Economics Association (New Name 2008: Agricultural and Applied Economics Association).
    3. Costa-Font, Montserrat & Gil, José M. & Traill, W. Bruce, 2008. "Consumer acceptance, valuation of and attitudes towards genetically modified food: Review and implications for food policy," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 33(2), pages 99-111, April.
    4. Fields, Deacue & Gillespie, Jeffrey M., 2008. "Beef Producer Preferences and Purchase Decisions for Livestock Price Insurance," Journal of Agricultural and Applied Economics, Southern Agricultural Economics Association, vol. 40(03), December.
    5. Jayson L. Lusk & Jutta Roosen & John A. Fox, 2003. "Demand for Beef from Cattle Administered Growth Hormones or Fed Genetically Modified Corn: A Comparison of Consumers in France, Germany, the United Kingdom, and the United States," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 85(1), pages 16-29.
    6. Baker, Gregory A. & Burnham, Thomas A., 2001. "Consumer Response To Genetically Modified Foods: Market Segment Analysis And Implications For Producers And Policy Makers," Journal of Agricultural and Resource Economics, Western Agricultural Economics Association, vol. 26(02), December.
    7. Michelle A. Haefele & John B. Loomis, 2001. "Improving Statistical Efficiency and Testing Robustness of Conjoint Marginal Valuations," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 83(5), pages 1321-1327.
    8. Bernard, John C. & Pesek, John D., Jr. & Pan, Xiqian, 2007. "Consumer Likelihood to Purchase Chickens with Novel Production Attributes," Journal of Agricultural and Applied Economics, Southern Agricultural Economics Association, vol. 39(03), December.
    9. W. Bruce Traill, 2004. "Effect of information about benefits of biotechnology on consumer acceptance of genetically modified food: evidence from experimental auctions in the United States, England, and France," European Review of Agricultural Economics, Foundation for the European Review of Agricultural Economics, vol. 31(2), pages 179-204, June.
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    chicken; conjoint analysis; corn; genetically modified; heteroscedastic; phosphorus pollution; Tobit; Environmental Economics and Policy; Q13; D12; C24;

    JEL classification:

    • Q13 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Agriculture - - - Agricultural Markets and Marketing; Cooperatives; Agribusiness
    • D12 - Microeconomics - - Household Behavior - - - Consumer Economics: Empirical Analysis
    • C24 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Single Equation Models; Single Variables - - - Truncated and Censored Models; Switching Regression Models; Threshold Regression Models

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