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In Honor of Matthew Rabin: Winner of the John Bates Clark Medal

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  • Colin Camerer
  • Richard H. Thaler

Abstract

Although there is some evidence that Matthew Rabin existed before 1990, we had the pleasure of discovering him for ourselves when, in the early 1990s, he sent each of us a copy of his manuscript "Incorporating Fairness into Game Theory and Economics" [2]. Matthew was, at this time, an assistant professor in Berkeley's economics department, having recently finished his graduate training at MIT. The paper was remarkable in many ways, and it induced us both to call around and ask: "Who is this guy Rabin?" Now, just a decade later, we find ourselves writing an article in honor of his winning the John Bates Clark award. So, who is this guy?

Suggested Citation

  • Colin Camerer & Richard H. Thaler, 2003. "In Honor of Matthew Rabin: Winner of the John Bates Clark Medal," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 17(3), pages 159-176, Summer.
  • Handle: RePEc:aea:jecper:v:17:y:2003:i:3:p:159-176 Note: DOI: 10.1257/089533003769204407
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    1. Akerlof, George A, 1991. "Procrastination and Obedience," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, pages 1-19.
    2. Costa-Gomes, Miguel A., 2002. "A Suggested Interpretation of Some Experimental Results on Preplay Communication," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, vol. 104(1), pages 104-136, May.
    3. David Laibson, 1997. "Golden Eggs and Hyperbolic Discounting," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 112(2), pages 443-478.
    4. Harris, Milton & Raviv, Artur, 1993. "Differences of Opinion Make a Horse Race," Review of Financial Studies, Society for Financial Studies, vol. 6(3), pages 473-506.
    5. Bradley J. Ruffle, 2000. "Some factors affecting demand withholding in posted-offer markets," Economic Theory, Springer;Society for the Advancement of Economic Theory (SAET), pages 529-544.
    6. Terrell, Dek, 1994. "A Test of the Gambler's Fallacy: Evidence from Pari-mutuel Games," Journal of Risk and Uncertainty, Springer, vol. 8(3), pages 309-317, May.
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    Blog mentions

    As found by EconAcademics.org, the blog aggregator for Economics research:
    1. Premio Nobel de Economía 2009: ¡Hagan sus apuestas!
      by jorpppp in Economía en la Panadería on 2009-10-09 09:08:00

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    Cited by:

    1. Thomas Webster, 2013. "A Note on the Ultimatum Paradox, Bounded Rationality, and Uncertainty," International Advances in Economic Research, Springer;International Atlantic Economic Society, pages 1-10.
    2. David Butler, 2012. "A choice for ‘me’ or for ‘us’? Using we-reasoning to predict cooperation and coordination in games," Theory and Decision, Springer, pages 53-76.
    3. Swee-Hoon Chuah & Robert Hoffmann & Jeremy Larner, 2011. "Escalation Bargaining: Theoretical Analysis and Experimental Test," Discussion Papers 2011-05, The Centre for Decision Research and Experimental Economics, School of Economics, University of Nottingham.
    4. David Laibson, 1997. "Golden Eggs and Hyperbolic Discounting," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 112(2), pages 443-478.
    5. Juan Carlos de Pablo, 2004. "La economía como proceso decisorio. Reseña de ideas ajenas," CEMA Working Papers: Serie Documentos de Trabajo. 263, Universidad del CEMA.
    6. Cox, James C. & Sadiraj, Vjollca, 2006. "Small- and large-stakes risk aversion: Implications of concavity calibration for decision theory," Games and Economic Behavior, Elsevier, vol. 56(1), pages 45-60, July.
    7. Juan Carlos De Pablo, 2005. "Después de Kahneman y Tversky; ¿Qué queda de la Teoría Económica?," Revista de Economía y Estadística, Universidad Nacional de Córdoba, Facultad de Ciencias Económicas, Instituto de Economía y Finanzas, vol. 0(1), pages 55-98, January.
    8. Haesevoets, Tessa & Reinders Folmer, Chris & De Cremer, David & Van Hiel, Alain, 2013. "Money isn’t all that matters: The use of financial compensation and apologies to preserve relationships in the aftermath of distributive harm," Journal of Economic Psychology, Elsevier, vol. 35(C), pages 95-107.
    9. repec:kap:iaecre:v:19:y:2013:i:1:p:1-10 is not listed on IDEAS

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