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Is a Long War Desirable? Optimal Debt Concessions in Attrition Warfare

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  • Maxime Menuet

Abstract

The present paper extends the Alesina and Drazen (1991, American Economic Review 81, 1170-1188) war of attrition model by including a concession round. Before the date of stabilization, each player can agree to finance an additional amount of public deficit with the aim of reducing public debt and distortionary taxes. We reveal that concessions reduce the cost of waiting and delay debt stabilization. The amount of concession positively depends on the chances of winning and on the degree of political polarization. When concession and dropping-out plans are chosen sequentially, there is at least one separating equilibria, in which the war of attrition disappears. Our paper provides new perspectives on the inefficiencies of stabilization programs in the aftermath of the recent sovereign debt crisis.

Suggested Citation

  • Maxime Menuet, 2020. "Is a Long War Desirable? Optimal Debt Concessions in Attrition Warfare," Annals of Economics and Statistics, GENES, issue 139, pages 105-130.
  • Handle: RePEc:adr:anecst:y:2020:i:139:p:105-130
    DOI: 10.15609/annaeconstat2009.139.0105
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    Cited by:

    1. Maxime Menuet, 2017. "Consensus-building in Electoral Competitions: Evidence from Papal Elections," Economics Bulletin, AccessEcon, vol. 37(4), pages 2826-2834.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    War of Attrition; Stabilization Delay; Concession; Non-cooperative Game;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • C72 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Game Theory and Bargaining Theory - - - Noncooperative Games
    • D74 - Microeconomics - - Analysis of Collective Decision-Making - - - Conflict; Conflict Resolution; Alliances; Revolutions
    • E62 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Macroeconomic Policy, Macroeconomic Aspects of Public Finance, and General Outlook - - - Fiscal Policy

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