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Labor Search and Matching in Macroeconomics

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  • Eran Yashiv
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    Abstract

    The labor search and matching model plays a growing role in macroeconomic analysis. This paper provides a critical, selective survey of the literature. Four fundamental questions are explored: how are unemployment, job vacancies, and employment determined as equilibrium phenomena? What determines worker flows and transition rates from one labor market state to another? How are wages determined? What role do labor market dynamics play in explaining business cycles and growth? The survey describes the basic model, reviews its theoretical extensions, and discusses its empirical applications in macroeconomics. The model has developed against the background of difficulties with the use of the neoclassical, frictionless model of the labor market in macroeconomics. Its success includes the modelling of labor market outcomes as equilibrium phenomena, the reasonable fit of the data, and — when inserted into business cycle models — improved performance of more general macroeconomic models. At the same time, there is evidence against the Nash solution used for wage setting and an active debate as to the ability of the model to account for some of the cyclical facts.

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    Bibliographic Info

    Paper provided by Centre for Economic Performance, LSE in its series CEP Discussion Papers with number dp0803.

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    Date of creation: Jun 2007
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    Handle: RePEc:cep:cepdps:dp0803

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    Web page: http://cep.lse.ac.uk/_new/publications/series.asp?prog=CEP

    Related research

    Keywords: search; matching; macroeconomics; business cycles; worker flows; growth; policy;

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    Cited by:
    1. Borowczyk-Martins, Daniel & Jolivet, Grégory & Postel-Vinay, Fabien, 2011. "Accounting For Endogenous Search Behavior in Matching Function Estimation," IZA Discussion Papers 5807, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    2. Zenou, Yves, 2007. "Search in Cities," CEPR Discussion Papers 6197, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    3. Mandelman, Federico S & Zanetti, Francesco, 2010. "Technology shocks, employment and labour market frictions," Bank of England working papers 390, Bank of England.
    4. Álvarez de Toledo, Pablo & Núñez, Fernando & Usabiaga, Carlos, 2013. "Labour Market Segmentation, Clusters, Mobility and Unemployment Duration with Individual Microdata," MPRA Paper 46003, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    5. Steven J. Davis & Jason Faberman & John C. Haltiwanger, 2011. "Labor Market Flows in the Cross Section and Over Time," NBER Working Papers 17294, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    6. Álvarez de Toledo, Pablo & Núñez, Fernando & Usabiaga, Carlos, 2014. "An empirical approach on labour segmentation. Applications with individual duration data," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 36(C), pages 252-267.
    7. Stops, Michael, 2012. "Job matching across occupational labour markets," IAB Discussion Paper 201227, Institut für Arbeitsmarkt- und Berufsforschung (IAB), Nürnberg [Institute for Employment Research, Nuremberg, Germany].
    8. Yokota, Koji, 2012. "Time Discount and Convex Hiring Cost," ビジネス創造センターディスカッション・ペーパー (Discussion papers of the Center for Business Creation) 10252/4850, Otaru University of Commerce.
    9. Alfonso Arpaia & Gilles Mourre, 2009. "Institutions and performance in European labour markets: taking a fresh look at evidence," European Economy - Economic Papers 391, Directorate General Economic and Monetary Affairs (DG ECFIN), European Commission.
    10. Federico S. Mandelman & Francesco Zanetti, 2008. "Estimating general equilibrium models: an application with labour market frictions," Technical Books, Centre for Central Banking Studies, Bank of England, edition 1, number 1.
    11. Christopher A. Pissarides, 2009. "The Unemployment Volatility Puzzle: Is Wage Stickiness the Answer?," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 77(5), pages 1339-1369, 09.
    12. Carlos Usabiaga & Fernando Núñez & Pablo Álvarez de Toledo, 2013. "Segmentación del mercado de trabajo, clusters, movilidad y duración de desempleo con datos individuales," Economic Working Papers at Centro de Estudios Andaluces E2013/02, Centro de Estudios Andaluces.
    13. Hutter, Christian & Weber, Enzo, 2013. "Constructing a new leading indicator for unemployment from a survey among German employment agencies," IAB Discussion Paper 201317, Institut für Arbeitsmarkt- und Berufsforschung (IAB), Nürnberg [Institute for Employment Research, Nuremberg, Germany].
    14. Daniel Borowczyk-Martins & Gregory Jolivet & Fabien Postel-Vinay, 2013. "Accounting For Endogeneity in Matching Function Estimation," Review of Economic Dynamics, Elsevier for the Society for Economic Dynamics, vol. 16(3), pages 440-451, July.
    15. R. Jason Faberman & John Haltiwanger & Steven J. Davis, 2010. "Labor Market Flows and Vacancies in the Cross Section and Over Time," 2010 Meeting Papers 1045, Society for Economic Dynamics.
    16. Masui, Makoto, 2011. "Jobs with different wage determination mechanisms, social efficiency and unemployment," Journal of the Japanese and International Economies, Elsevier, vol. 25(1), pages 56-75, March.

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