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Freeze! Financial sanctions and bank responses

Author

Listed:
  • Goldbach, Stefan
  • Efing, Matthias
  • Nitsch, Volker

Abstract

We study the effects of financial sanctions on cross-border credit supply. Using a differences-in-differences approach to analyze eleven sanctions episodes between 2002 and 2015, we find that banks located in Germany reduce their positions in countries with sanctioned entities by 38%. The average German branch or subsidiary located outside Germany does not adjust its positions after the imposition of sanctions. For affiliated banks located in countries with low financial standards, we even observe a relative increase in credit supply. These effects are stronger if sanctions are only imposed by EU member states and not by the entire UN.

Suggested Citation

  • Goldbach, Stefan & Efing, Matthias & Nitsch, Volker, 2019. "Freeze! Financial sanctions and bank responses," VfS Annual Conference 2019 (Leipzig): 30 Years after the Fall of the Berlin Wall - Democracy and Market Economy 203480, Verein für Socialpolitik / German Economic Association.
  • Handle: RePEc:zbw:vfsc19:203480
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Tibor Besedeš & Stefan Goldbach & Volker Nitsch, 2018. "Cheap Talk? Financial Sanctions and Non-Financial Activity," CESifo Working Paper Series 7069, CESifo.
    2. Temesvary, Judit, 2014. "The determinants of U.S. banks’ international activities," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 44(C), pages 233-247.
    3. Tibor Besedeš & Stefan Goldbach & Volker Nitsch, 2017. "You’re banned! The effect of sanctions on German cross-border financial flows," Economic Policy, CEPR;CES;MSH, vol. 32(90), pages 263-318.
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    6. Asim Ijaz Khwaja & Atif Mian, 2008. "Tracing the Impact of Bank Liquidity Shocks: Evidence from an Emerging Market," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 98(4), pages 1413-1442, September.
    7. Gary Clyde Hufbauer & Jeffrey J. Schott & Kimberly Ann Elliott, 2007. "Economic Sanctions Reconsidered, 3rd edition (hardcover)," Peterson Institute Press: All Books, Peterson Institute for International Economics, number 4075, January.
    8. Ongena, Steven & Popov, Alexander & Udell, Gregory F., 2013. "“When the cat's away the mice will play”: Does regulation at home affect bank risk-taking abroad?," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 108(3), pages 727-750.
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    10. Kaempfer, William H. & Lowenberg, Anton D., 2007. "The Political Economy of Economic Sanctions," Handbook of Defense Economics, in: Keith Hartley & Todd Sandler (ed.), Handbook of Defense Economics, edition 1, volume 2, chapter 27, pages 867-911, Elsevier.
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    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    financial sanctions; law and finance; cross-border lending; international banking;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • F51 - International Economics - - International Relations, National Security, and International Political Economy - - - International Conflicts; Negotiations; Sanctions
    • G18 - Financial Economics - - General Financial Markets - - - Government Policy and Regulation
    • G28 - Financial Economics - - Financial Institutions and Services - - - Government Policy and Regulation
    • G38 - Financial Economics - - Corporate Finance and Governance - - - Government Policy and Regulation
    • K33 - Law and Economics - - Other Substantive Areas of Law - - - International Law

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