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Economic Origins of Cultural Norms: The Case of Animal Husbandry and Bastardy

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  • Eder, Christoph
  • Halla, Martin

Abstract

We explore the origins of the cultural norm regarding illegitimacy and test the hypothesis that traditional agricultural production structures influenced the historical illegitimacy ratio, and have a lasting effect until today. Based on data dating back to the Austro-Hungarian Empire, we use exogenous variation in the local agricultural suitability to show that descendants from societies focusing on animal husbandry (and not crop farming) are today still more likely to have a non-marital birth.

Suggested Citation

  • Eder, Christoph & Halla, Martin, 2017. "Economic Origins of Cultural Norms: The Case of Animal Husbandry and Bastardy," VfS Annual Conference 2017 (Vienna): Alternative Structures for Money and Banking 168090, Verein für Socialpolitik / German Economic Association.
  • Handle: RePEc:zbw:vfsc17:168090
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    Cited by:

    1. Fredriksson, Per G. & Gupta, Satyendra Kumar, 2020. "Irrigation and Culture: Gender Roles and Women’s Rights," GLO Discussion Paper Series 681, Global Labor Organization (GLO).

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    JEL classification:

    • J13 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Fertility; Family Planning; Child Care; Children; Youth

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