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Girl power: the European marriage pattern and labour markets in the North Sea region in the late medieval and early modern period1

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  • TINE DE MOOR
  • JAN LUITEN VAN ZANDEN

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  • Tine De Moor & Jan Luiten Van Zanden, 2010. "Girl power: the European marriage pattern and labour markets in the North Sea region in the late medieval and early modern period1," Economic History Review, Economic History Society, vol. 63(1), pages 1-33, February.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:ehsrev:v:63:y:2010:i:1:p:1-33
    DOI: 10.1111/j.1468-0289.2009.00483.x
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Munro, John H., 2007. "The usury doctrine and urban public finances in late-medieval Flanders (1220 - 1550): rentes (annuities), excise taxes, and income transfers from the poor to the rich," MPRA Paper 11012, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised Jan 2008.
    2. de Vries, Jan, 1994. "The Industrial Revolution and the Industrious Revolution," The Journal of Economic History, Cambridge University Press, vol. 54(2), pages 249-270, June.
    3. Lindert, Peter H., 1998. "Poor relief before the Welfare State: Britain versus the Continent, 1780–1880," European Review of Economic History, Cambridge University Press, vol. 2(2), pages 101-140, August.
    4. Weir, David R., 1984. "Life Under Pressure: France and England, 1670–1870," The Journal of Economic History, Cambridge University Press, vol. 44(1), pages 27-47, March.
    5. Lena Edlund & Nils-Petter Lagerlöf, 2006. "Individual versus Parental Consent in Marriage: Implications for Intra-Household Resource Allocation and Growth," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 96(2), pages 304-307, May.
    6. Mark Bailey, 1996. "Demographic decline in late medieval England: some thoughts on recent research," Economic History Review, Economic History Society, vol. 49(1), pages 1-19, February.
    7. Lagerlöf, Nils-Petter & Edlund, Lena, 2006. "Individual vs. Parental Consent in Marriage: Implications for Intra-Household Resource Allocation and Growth," CEPR Discussion Papers 5474, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    8. Botticini, Maristella, 1999. "A Loveless Economy? Intergenerational Altruism and the Marriage Market in a Tuscan Town, 1415–1436," The Journal of Economic History, Cambridge University Press, vol. 59(1), pages 104-121, March.
    9. Gregory Clark, 2007. "The long march of history: Farm wages, population, and economic growth, England 1209–18691," Economic History Review, Economic History Society, vol. 60(1), pages 97-135, February.
    10. Clark, Gregory, 1988. "The cost of capital and medieval agricultural technique," Explorations in Economic History, Elsevier, vol. 25(3), pages 265-294, July.
    11. Dyer,Christopher, 1989. "Standards of Living in the Later Middle Ages," Cambridge Books, Cambridge University Press, number 9780521272155.
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