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The Labour Supply of Women in STEM

  • Schlenker, Eva

The purpose of this paper is to assess the determinants of female labour supply in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM). Using data from the European Statistics on Income and Living Conditions (EU-SILC), the author finds that women in STEM work more hours, but have a higher probability to be out of the labour force. Additionally, empirical evidence is found that maternal employment in STEM is also significantly more pronounced. To account for selection problems, a special type of grouping estimator and a control function approach is used. The estimation results show, that women in STEM work less hours in countries with higher levels of family allowances. However, this effect is only weakly significant and small compared to the overall effects of larger levels of expenditures on family allowance and child benefits.

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File URL: http://econstor.eu/bitstream/10419/79981/1/VfS_2013_pid_672.pdf
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Paper provided by Verein für Socialpolitik / German Economic Association in its series Annual Conference 2013 (Duesseldorf): Competition Policy and Regulation in a Global Economic Order with number 79981.

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Date of creation: 2013
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Handle: RePEc:zbw:vfsc13:79981
Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.socialpolitik.org/
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  11. Scott E. Carrell & Marianne E. Page & James E. West, 2010. "Sex and Science: How Professor Gender Perpetuates the Gender Gap," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, MIT Press, vol. 125(3), pages 1101-1144, August.
  12. Goldin, Claudia & Kuziemko, Ilyana & Katz, Lawrence, 2006. "The Homecoming of American College Women: The Reversal of the College Gender Gap," Scholarly Articles 2962611, Harvard University Department of Economics.
  13. Eva Schlenker, 2009. "Frauen als Stille Reserve im Ingenieurwesen," Diskussionspapiere aus dem Institut für Volkswirtschaftslehre der Universität Hohenheim 315/2009, Department of Economics, University of Hohenheim, Germany.
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  15. Rukwid, Ralf & Christ, Julian P., 2012. "Innovationspotentiale in Baden-Württemberg: Produktionscluster im Bereich "Metall, Elektro, IKT" und regionale Verfügbarkeit akademischer Fachkräfte in den MINT -Fächern," FZID Discussion Papers 45-2012, University of Hohenheim, Center for Research on Innovation and Services (FZID).
  16. Karl Brenke, 2012. "Engineers in Germany: No Shortage in Sight," DIW Economic Bulletin, DIW Berlin, German Institute for Economic Research, vol. 2(5), pages 3-8.
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  18. Nicole M Fortin, 2005. "Gender Role Attitudes and the Labour-market Outcomes of Women across OECD Countries," Oxford Review of Economic Policy, Oxford University Press, vol. 21(3), pages 416-438, Autumn.
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