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Frauen als Stille Reserve im Ingenieurwesen



Recent developments in the German demography will give rise to a shortage in skilled workers in the coming decades. The German economy is in need of thousands of engineers already. A solution to this problem might involve a higher degree of integration of female engineers into the workforce. Data from the microcensus 2006, the official representative statistics of the population and the labour market in Germany, confirm the existence of a hidden reserve of female engineers. Ordered response models and seminonparametric estimation methods are used to show that the labour supply in the engineering sector is mainly determined by age. In addition, the labour supply of female engineers depends on how many children they have, on the age of their youngest child, and on their partners' income. Moreover, women care more about their families, rather than focusing on their career.

Suggested Citation

  • Eva Schlenker, 2009. "Frauen als Stille Reserve im Ingenieurwesen," Diskussionspapiere aus dem Institut für Volkswirtschaftslehre der Universität Hohenheim 315/2009, Department of Economics, University of Hohenheim, Germany.
  • Handle: RePEc:hoh:hohdip:315

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Richard Blundell & Alan Duncan & Costas Meghir, 1998. "Estimating Labor Supply Responses Using Tax Reforms," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 66(4), pages 827-862, July.
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    6. Wagenhals Gerhard, 2000. "Arbeitsangebotseffekte des Steuer- und Transfersystems in der Bundesrepublik Deutschland / Labour Supply Effects of the Tax and Benefit System in the Federal Republic of Germany," Journal of Economics and Statistics (Jahrbuecher fuer Nationaloekonomie und Statistik), De Gruyter, vol. 220(2), pages 191-213, April.
    7. J.D. Vlasblom & J.J. Schippers, 2004. "Increases in Female Labour Force Participation in Europe: Similarities and Differences," Working Papers 04-12, Utrecht School of Economics.
    8. Laisney, François & Beninger, Denis & Beblo, Miriam, 2003. "Family Tax Splitting: A Microsimulation of its Potential Labour Supply and Intra-household Welfare Effects in Germany," ZEW Discussion Papers 03-32, ZEW - Zentrum für Europäische Wirtschaftsforschung / Center for European Economic Research.
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    Cited by:

    1. Schlenker, Eva, 2013. "The Labour Supply of Women in STEM," Annual Conference 2013 (Duesseldorf): Competition Policy and Regulation in a Global Economic Order 79981, Verein für Socialpolitik / German Economic Association.

    More about this item


    Demographischer Wandel; Discrete Choice-Modelle; Fachkräftemangel; Frauenerwerbstätigkeit;

    JEL classification:

    • J21 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Labor Force and Employment, Size, and Structure
    • J22 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Time Allocation and Labor Supply
    • J24 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Human Capital; Skills; Occupational Choice; Labor Productivity

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