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Banks, Markets, and Financial Stability

  • Fecht, Falko
  • Eder, Armin
  • Pausch, Thilo

In a theoretical model of the Diamond-Dybvig style, in which deposit-taking banks and financial markets coexist, bank behavior is analyzed taking into account a positive ex-ante probability of a future financial crisis. We focus on the role of the interaction of market liquidity and banks' funding liquidity in the propagation of shocks in the financial system. Our findings suggest that in particular bank-dominated financial systems are prone to contagious bank runs due to asset price deteriorations as a consequence of fire sales of assets in financial markets. Nevertheless, banks only prefer holding liquidity buffers to weather future crises if the ex-ante crisis probability exceeds a certain threshold. Moreover, central bank interventions are shown to have destabilizing effects because they reduce banks' incentives to hold liquidity buffers. This can be interpreted as a justification for prudential regulation in terms of minimum liquidity buffer requirements.

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File URL: http://econstor.eu/bitstream/10419/79712/1/VfS_2013_pid_166.pdf
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Paper provided by Verein für Socialpolitik / German Economic Association in its series Annual Conference 2013 (Duesseldorf): Competition Policy and Regulation in a Global Economic Order with number 79712.

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Date of creation: 2013
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Handle: RePEc:zbw:vfsc13:79712
Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.socialpolitik.org/
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  1. Douglas W. Diamond & Raghuram G. Rajan, 2002. "Liquidity Shortages and Banking Crises," NBER Working Papers 8937, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  2. Heider, Florian & Hoerova, Marie & Holthausen, Cornelia, 2010. "Liquidity Hoarding and Interbank Market Spreads: The Role of Counterparty Risk," CEPR Discussion Papers 7762, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  3. Freixas, X. & Martin, A. & Skeie, D., 2010. "Bank Liquidity, Interbank Markets, and Monetary Policy," Discussion Paper 2010-35S, Tilburg University, Center for Economic Research.
  4. Falko Fecht, 2003. "On the Stability of Different Financial Systems," Working Paper Series: Finance and Accounting 110, Department of Finance, Goethe University Frankfurt am Main.
  5. Douglas W. Diamond & Raghuram G. Rajan, 2001. "Liquidity Risk, Liquidity Creation, and Financial Fragility: A Theory of Banking," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 109(2), pages 287-327, April.
  6. Douglas W. Diamond & Philip H. Dybvig, 2000. "Bank runs, deposit insurance, and liquidity," Quarterly Review, Federal Reserve Bank of Minneapolis, issue Win, pages 14-23.
  7. Cooper, Russell & Ross, Thomas W., 1998. "Bank runs: Liquidity costs and investment distortions," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 41(1), pages 27-38, February.
  8. Viral V. Acharya & S. Viswanathan, 2010. "Leverage, Moral Hazard and Liquidity," NBER Working Papers 15837, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  9. Lasse Heje Pederson & Markus K Brunnermeier, 2007. "Market Liquidity and Funding Liquidity," FMG Discussion Papers dp580, Financial Markets Group.
  10. Douglas W. Diamond, . "Liquidity, Banks and Markets," CRSP working papers 326, Center for Research in Security Prices, Graduate School of Business, University of Chicago.
  11. Rodrigo Cifuentes & Hyun Song Shin & Gianluigi Ferrucci, 2005. "Liquidity Risk and Contagion," Journal of the European Economic Association, MIT Press, vol. 3(2-3), pages 556-566, 04/05.
  12. Tobias Adrian & Hyun Song Shin, 2008. "Liquidity and leverage," Staff Reports 328, Federal Reserve Bank of New York.
  13. Jennifer Huang & Jiang Wang, 2008. "Market Liquidity, Asset Prices and Welfare," NBER Working Papers 14058, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  14. Holmstrom, Bengt & Tirole, Jean, 2000. "Liquidity and Risk Management," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 32(3), pages 295-319, August.
  15. Douglas Gale & Tanju Yorulmazer, 2011. "Liquidity Hoarding," FMG Discussion Papers dp682, Financial Markets Group.
  16. Allen, Franklin & Carletti, Elena, 2008. "Mark-to-market accounting and liquidity pricing," Journal of Accounting and Economics, Elsevier, vol. 45(2-3), pages 358-378, August.
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