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The Impact of Cohort Size and Local Labor Market Conditions on Human Capital Accumulation in Europe

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  • Middendorf, Torge

Abstract

Recent studies emphasize the impact of macroeconomic factors on educational attainment. They show that although individual factors like the educational level of one's parents play a decisive role in determining the human capital accumulation of the children, the cohort size as well as the local labor market seem to have a significant impact, too. This paper analyzes the impact of birth cohort size as well as unemployment on educational attainment in Europe using the European Community Household Panel. Estimation results suggest that neither the size of the birth cohort nor the local unemployment rate induces a change in the individual's schooling decision.

Suggested Citation

  • Middendorf, Torge, 2007. "The Impact of Cohort Size and Local Labor Market Conditions on Human Capital Accumulation in Europe," Ruhr Economic Papers 10, RWI - Leibniz-Institut für Wirtschaftsforschung, Ruhr-University Bochum, TU Dortmund University, University of Duisburg-Essen.
  • Handle: RePEc:zbw:rwirep:10
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Educational attainment; demography; multivariate ordered probit;

    JEL classification:

    • I21 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Analysis of Education
    • J21 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Labor Force and Employment, Size, and Structure
    • J62 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Job, Occupational and Intergenerational Mobility; Promotion

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