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Does Personality Affect how People Perceive their Health?

  • Dusanee Kesavayuth
  • Robert Rosenman
  • Vasileios Zikos


    (School of Economic Sciences, Washington State University)

We examine how personality relates to self-reported health satisfaction. With a nation-wide dataset from the United Kingdom, we provide evidence that personality influences how individuals report their satisfaction with their overall health. Using the classification of personality traits according to the Big Five factors, we show that Agreeableness, Conscientiousness and to a lesser extent Openness relate positively to health satisfaction, while Neuroticism relates negatively. Extraversion appears much less closely tied to health satisfaction. Perhaps most interesting, our results provide some evidence that personality traits mitigate the importance of the incidence of illness on health satisfaction.

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Paper provided by School of Economic Sciences, Washington State University in its series Working Papers with number 2013-13.

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Length: 28 pages
Date of creation: 2013
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:wsu:wpaper:rosenman-16
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