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Survey design and the determinants of subjective wellbeing: an experimental analysis

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  • Holford, Angus
  • Pudney, Stephen

Abstract

We analyse the results of experiments on questionnaire design and interview mode in the first four waves (2008-11) of the UK Understanding Society Innovation Panel survey. The randomised experiments relate to job, health, income, leisure and overall life-satisfaction questions and vary the labeling of response scales, mode of interviewing, and location of questions within the interview. We find significant evidence of an influence of interview mode and question design on the distribution of reported satisfaction measures, particularly for women. Results from the sort of conditional modeling used to address real research questions appear less vulnerable to design influences. Â

Suggested Citation

  • Holford, Angus & Pudney, Stephen, 2014. "Survey design and the determinants of subjective wellbeing: an experimental analysis," Understanding Society Working Paper Series 2014-06, Understanding Society at the Institute for Social and Economic Research.
  • Handle: RePEc:ese:ukhlsp:2014-06
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    13. Burton, Jonathan & Laurie, Heather & Uhrig, S.C. Noah & Bryan, Mark L. & Desousa, Carol & Fumagalli, Laura & Jäckle, Annette & Knies, Gundi & Lynn, Peter & Nandi, Alita & Platt, Lucinda & Pudney, Ste, 2008. "Understanding Society. Some preliminary results from the Wave 1 Innovation Panel," Understanding Society Working Paper Series 2008-03, Understanding Society at the Institute for Social and Economic Research.
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    1. repec:eee:socmed:v:191:y:2017:i:c:p:9-18 is not listed on IDEAS

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • C23 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Single Equation Models; Single Variables - - - Models with Panel Data; Spatio-temporal Models
    • C25 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Single Equation Models; Single Variables - - - Discrete Regression and Qualitative Choice Models; Discrete Regressors; Proportions; Probabilities
    • C81 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Data Collection and Data Estimation Methodology; Computer Programs - - - Methodology for Collecting, Estimating, and Organizing Microeconomic Data; Data Access
    • J28 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Safety; Job Satisfaction; Related Public Policy

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