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A direct method for estimating the compensating income variation for severe headache and migraine

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  • Groot, Wim
  • Maassen van den Brink, Henriëtte

Abstract

A subjective quality of life measurement method is introduced to calculate the compensating income variation for diseases and handicaps. This approach avoids some of the limitations of existing methods. The method is based on the direct measurement of life satisfaction of individuals. We apply the method to severe headache and migraine. It is found that severe headache and migraine have a large effect on well being and that the compensating income variation for severe headache and migraine is substantial.

Suggested Citation

  • Groot, Wim & Maassen van den Brink, Henriëtte, 2004. "A direct method for estimating the compensating income variation for severe headache and migraine," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 58(2), pages 305-314, January.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:socmed:v:58:y:2004:i:2:p:305-314
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Wim Groot & Henriëtte Brink & Bernard Praag, 2007. "The Compensating Income Variation of Social Capital," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, vol. 82(2), pages 189-207, June.
    2. Dusanee Kesavayuth & Robert Rosenman & Vasileios Zikos, 2013. "Does Personality Affect how People Perceive their Health?," Working Papers 2013-13, School of Economic Sciences, Washington State University.
    3. Mendolia, Silvia & McNamee, Paul & Yerokhin, Oleg, 2018. "The Transmission of Mental Health within Households: Does One Partner's Mental Health Influence the Other Partner's Life Satisfaction?," IZA Discussion Papers 11431, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    4. Groot, Wim & Maassen van den Brink, Henriette & van Praag, Bernard M. S., 2006. "The Compensating Income Variation of Social Capital," IZA Discussion Papers 2529, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    5. Holford, Angus & Pudney, Stephen, 2014. "Survey design and the determinants of subjective wellbeing: an experimental analysis," Understanding Society Working Paper Series 2014-06, Understanding Society at the Institute for Social and Economic Research.
    6. Brad R. Humphreys & Bruce K. Johnson & John C. Whitehead, 2017. "Validity and Reliability of Contingent Valuation and Life Satisfaction Measures of Welfare: An Application to the Value of National Olympic Success," Working Papers 17-08, Department of Economics, Appalachian State University.
    7. Howley, Peter, 2017. "Less money or better health? Evaluating individual’s willingness to make trade-offs using life satisfaction data," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 135(C), pages 53-65.
    8. Hancock, Ruth & Morciano, Marcello & Pudney, Stephen, 2013. "Nonparametric estimation of a compensating variation: the cost of disability," ISER Working Paper Series 2013-26, Institute for Social and Economic Research.
    9. Howley, P., 2016. "Valuing the benefits from health care interventions using life satisfaction data," Health, Econometrics and Data Group (HEDG) Working Papers 16/01, HEDG, c/o Department of Economics, University of York.
    10. McNamee, Paul & Mendolia, Silvia, 2014. "The effect of chronic pain on life satisfaction: Evidence from Australian data," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 121(C), pages 65-73.

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