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Does economic prosperity bring about a happier society? Empirical remarks on the Easterlin Paradox debate sans Happiness Adaptation

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  • Beja Jr., Edsel

Abstract

Empirical analysis confirms the Easterlin Paradox: there is indeed a statistically significant and positive, albeit very small, relationship between economic growth and happiness. Notwithstanding a conclusion based on statistical significance, economic analysis of the results, on the other hand, still affirms the Easterlin Paradox: there is little economic significance in a very small estimate of the relationship between economic growth and happiness. An argument can also be forwarded that the increase in happiness is not an automatic outcome of economic growth because happiness is more than about income.

Suggested Citation

  • Beja Jr., Edsel, 2013. "Does economic prosperity bring about a happier society? Empirical remarks on the Easterlin Paradox debate sans Happiness Adaptation," MPRA Paper 50633, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  • Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:50633
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    File URL: https://mpra.ub.uni-muenchen.de/51698/8/MPRA_paper_51698.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Easterlin Paradox; economic growth; happiness; time;

    JEL classification:

    • A2 - General Economics and Teaching - - Economic Education and Teaching of Economics
    • C4 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Econometric and Statistical Methods: Special Topics
    • I3 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Welfare, Well-Being, and Poverty
    • O4 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Growth and Aggregate Productivity

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