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Glücksforschung: Stand der Dinge und Bedeutung für die Ökonomik

Listed author(s):
  • Hirata Johannes
Registered author(s):

    Modern happiness research has flourished during the last couple of years and has produced a number of valuable insights. At the same time, however, the observer occasionally gets the impression that happiness research is heterogeneous and suffers from a lack of orientation with the consequence that the overarching aim of the research program and the significance of the results remain obscure. Starting from an analysis of the preconditions and methods of modern happiness research, this article critically discusses some fundamental questions and the possible significance of happiness research for economics.

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    File URL: https://www.degruyter.com/view/j/ordo.2010.61.issue-1/ordo-2010-0110/ordo-2010-0110.xml?format=INT
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    Article provided by De Gruyter in its journal ORDO. Jahrbuch für die Ordnung von Wirtschaft und Gesellschaft.

    Volume (Year): 61 (2010)
    Issue (Month): 1 (January)
    Pages: 127-150

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    Handle: RePEc:bpj:ordojb:v:61:y:2010:i:1:p:127-150:n:10
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