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Drivers of global liquidity and global bank flows: A view from the euro area

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  • Mary Everett

Abstract

This paper exploits a novel bank-level monthly dataset to assess the effects of global liquidity on the global flows of euro area banks. The period associated with the European sovereign debt crisis has witnessed increased growth in euro area bank claims on extra-euro area residents, against a background of contracting euro area credit supply. Controlling for bank risk, global credit demand, and price effects such as interest rate differentials and exchange rates, empirical evidence supports a range of determinants of global liquidity - including global risk, global bank equity and unconventional monetary policy in the US, UK, Japan and euro area - as drivers of the global flows of euro area banks. Moreover, regression analysis indicates heterogeneity in the influence of global liquidity on global flows across euro area bank type, defined by their balance sheet composition and country of residence (stressed versus non-stressed euro area countries). The results highlight the importance of exogenous factors as drivers of global bank flows and the potential for international leakages of unconventional monetary policy.

Suggested Citation

  • Mary Everett, 2016. "Drivers of global liquidity and global bank flows: A view from the euro area," FIW Working Paper series 168, FIW.
  • Handle: RePEc:wsr:wpaper:y:2016:i:168
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Philip R. Lane & Peter McQuade, 2014. "Domestic Credit Growth and International Capital Flows," Scandinavian Journal of Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 116(1), pages 218-252, January.
    2. Bassett, William F. & Chosak, Mary Beth & Driscoll, John C. & ZakrajŇ°ek, Egon, 2014. "Changes in bank lending standards and the macroeconomy," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 62(C), pages 23-40.
    3. Eugenio M Cerutti & Stijn Claessens & Lev Ratnovski, 2014. "Global Liquidity and Drivers of Cross-Border Bank Flows," IMF Working Papers 14/69, International Monetary Fund.
    4. Cerutti, Eugenio, 2015. "Drivers of cross-border banking exposures during the crisis," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 55(C), pages 340-357.
    5. Claudio Borio, 2010. "Ten propositions about liquidity crises," CESifo Economic Studies, CESifo, vol. 56(1), pages 70-95, March.
    6. Reinhardt, Dennis & Riddiough, Steven, 2014. "The two faces of cross-border banking flows: an investigation into the links between global risk, arms-length funding and internal capital markets," Bank of England working papers 498, Bank of England.
    7. Shin, Hyun Song, 2010. "Risk and Liquidity," OUP Catalogue, Oxford University Press, number 9780199546367.
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    Cited by:

    1. McQuade, Peter & Schmitz, Martin, 2017. "The great moderation in international capital flows: A global phenomenon?," Journal of International Money and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 73(PA), pages 188-212.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Global bank flows; cross-border banking; global risk; global liquidity; European sovereign crisis; unconventional monetary policy spillovers; credit supply;

    JEL classification:

    • F60 - International Economics - - Economic Impacts of Globalization - - - General
    • G15 - Financial Economics - - General Financial Markets - - - International Financial Markets
    • G21 - Financial Economics - - Financial Institutions and Services - - - Banks; Other Depository Institutions; Micro Finance Institutions; Mortgages

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