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AIDS and income distribution in Africa. A micro-simulation study for Cˆote d’Ivoire

Author

Listed:
  • Michael Grimm

    (University of G¨ottingen, Department of Economics)

  • Denis Cogneau

    (DIAL-IRD, Paris)

Abstract

We develop a demo-economic micro-simulation model able to simulate over a fifteen years period the impact of AIDS on household and individual incomes. When focusing on the labor supply effects of over- mortality, the main effect of AIDS in Cˆote d’Ivoire is a shrinking of the size of the economy by around 6% after 15 years, leaving average income per capita, income inequality, and poverty roughly unchanged. The dependency ratio is not much modified by the epidemic. These conclusions do not seem to depend on the degree of heterogeneity and clustering of the HIV/AIDS-infections over the population.

Suggested Citation

  • Michael Grimm & Denis Cogneau, 2004. "AIDS and income distribution in Africa. A micro-simulation study for Cˆote d’Ivoire," Labor and Demography 0408006, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  • Handle: RePEc:wpa:wuwpla:0408006
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
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    Cited by:

    1. Pierre-Richard AGÉNOR & Derek H. C. CHEN & Michael GRIMM, "undated". "Linking Representative Household Models with Household Surveys for Poverty Analysis: A Comparison of Alternative Methodologies," EcoMod2004 330600002, EcoMod.
    2. Denis Cogneau & Michael Grimm, 2006. "Socioeconomic status, sexual behavior, and differential AIDS mortality: evidence from Côte d’Ivoire," Population Research and Policy Review, Springer;Southern Demographic Association (SDA), vol. 25(4), pages 393-407, August.
    3. Denis Cogneau & Anne-Sophie Robilliard, 2004. "Poverty Alleviation Policies in Madagascar: a Micro-Macro Simulation Model," Working Papers DT/2004/11, DIAL (Développement, Institutions et Mondialisation), revised Nov 2004.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    AIDS; labor supply; income distribution;

    JEL classification:

    • J - Labor and Demographic Economics

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