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The 'Europeanization' Of The Common Road Safety Policy: An Econometric Analysis


  • Mercedes Castro-Nuno


  • Jose I. Castillo-Manzano
  • Xavier Fageda



The 2001 White Paper and its development in the 3rd European Road Safety Action Program, represent a turning point in the history of the European Road Safety Policy. The possible determinants of the road mortality in the EU over (2000-2009) are examined using a panel data. Our main finding is the negative effect and statistical significance of the Europeanization variable (the number of years that a country has been in the EU). By this variable, we test the effectiveness of EU programs to save lives in road accidents according to the years that each country has been in the EU.

Suggested Citation

  • Mercedes Castro-Nuno & Jose I. Castillo-Manzano & Xavier Fageda, 2013. "The 'Europeanization' Of The Common Road Safety Policy: An Econometric Analysis," ERSA conference papers ersa13p50, European Regional Science Association.
  • Handle: RePEc:wiw:wiwrsa:ersa13p50

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    References listed on IDEAS

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    More about this item


    Common Transport Policy; Europeanization; Shared Target; Road Safety; Subsidiarity; Panel Data;

    JEL classification:

    • C23 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Single Equation Models; Single Variables - - - Models with Panel Data; Spatio-temporal Models
    • F59 - International Economics - - International Relations, National Security, and International Political Economy - - - Other
    • I18 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - Government Policy; Regulation; Public Health
    • R41 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - Transportation Economics - - - Transportation: Demand, Supply, and Congestion; Travel Time; Safety and Accidents; Transportation Noise


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