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Gender and Occupational Mobility in Urban China during the Economic Transition

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  • Yueping Song
  • Xiao-yuan Dong

Abstract

This paper examines the gender patterns of occupational mobility in post-reform Urban China using a national representative dataset. The results reveal marked differences between married men and women: women are more likely than men to undergo lateral or downward occupational changes, but are less likely to experience upward mobility. The results also show that the public-sector restructuring has increased the incidence of downward occupational mobility, more for women than men. The analysis suggests that women are disadvantaged in the occupational mobility process by a variety of social and institutional factors.

Suggested Citation

  • Yueping Song & Xiao-yuan Dong, 2011. "Gender and Occupational Mobility in Urban China during the Economic Transition," Departmental Working Papers 2011-01, The University of Winnipeg, Department of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:win:winwop:2011-01
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    Cited by:

    1. Rickne, Johanna, 2010. "Gender, Wages and Social Security in China’s Industrial Sector," Working Paper Series 2010:8, Uppsala University, Department of Economics.
    2. Dasgupta, Sukti. & Matsumoto, Makiko. & Xia, Cuntao., 2015. "Women in the labour market in China," ILO Working Papers 994879663402676, International Labour Organization.
    3. Nuno Crespo & Nadia Simoes & Sandrina B. Moreira, 2014. "Gender differences in occupational mobility - evidence from Portugal," International Review of Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 28(4), pages 460-481, July.
    4. Naila Kabeer, 2016. "Gender Equality, Economic Growth, and Women's Agency: the "Endless Variety" and "Monotonous Similarity" of Patriarchal Constraints," Feminist Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 22(1), pages 295-321, January.
    5. Jinghong Liu, 2019. "What Does In-Work Poverty Mean for Women: Comparing the Gender Employment Segregation in Belgium and China," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 11(20), pages 1-25, October.
    6. Dong, Xiao-yuan & Pandey, Manish, 2012. "Gender and labor retrenchment in Chinese state owned enterprises: Investigation using firm-level panel data," China Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 23(2), pages 385-395.
    7. repec:ilo:ilowps:487966 is not listed on IDEAS

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Occupational mobility; Gender; Economic transition; Social networks;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • J16 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Economics of Gender; Non-labor Discrimination
    • J63 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Turnover; Vacancies; Layoffs
    • C25 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Single Equation Models; Single Variables - - - Discrete Regression and Qualitative Choice Models; Discrete Regressors; Proportions; Probabilities
    • R20 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - Household Analysis - - - General

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