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De- versus Re-industrialisation: Is Structural Change Reversible?

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  • Michael Peneder
  • Gerhard Streicher

Abstract

We investigate the causes of de-industrialisation and potential for re-industrialisation. Using WIOD data and introducing new measures of "induced value added chains", we directly relate a sector's income share to the net value added flows as induced by domestic and foreign final demand. This method identifies the declining share of manufacturing in domestic expenditures on final demand to be the main cause of de-industrialisation. International trade has a limited impact, though differences in comparative advantage between countries do matter. In addition, the strong decline of relative prices in manufacturing points to an interesting policy paradox: precisely if successful in raising competitiveness and hence productivity growth of manufacturing, they also further its global decline of relative prices. Contrary to the stated objective of re-industrialisation, meaningful industrial policies will accelerate de-industrialisation in the global economy. To raise the income share of manufacturing, policies must target, e.g., competition and productivity growth in services.

Suggested Citation

  • Michael Peneder & Gerhard Streicher, 2016. "De- versus Re-industrialisation: Is Structural Change Reversible?," WIFO Working Papers 506, WIFO.
  • Handle: RePEc:wfo:wpaper:y:2016:i:506
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. repec:spr:epolin:v:44:y:2017:i:3:d:10.1007_s40812-017-0073-x is not listed on IDEAS
    2. Meurers, Martin & Moenius, Johannes, 2018. "Optimal Public Investment in Economic Centers and the Periphery," Annual Conference 2018 (Freiburg, Breisgau): Digital Economy 181579, Verein für Socialpolitik / German Economic Association.
    3. repec:kap:jincot:v:17:y:2017:i:3:d:10.1007_s10842-016-0237-9 is not listed on IDEAS
    4. Gruber, Harald, 2017. "Innovation, Skills and Investment: A Digital Industrial Policy for Europe," 28th European Regional ITS Conference, Passau 2017 169464, International Telecommunications Society (ITS).

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