IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/p/wfo/wpaper/y2001i146.html
   My bibliography  Save this paper

What Follows Tertiarisation? Structural Change and the Role of Knowledge-based Services

Author

Listed:
  • Michael Peneder

    (WIFO)

  • Serguei Kaniovski

    (WIFO)

  • Bernhard Dachs

Abstract

The rise of the service economy has been the predominant pattern of structural change in the twentieth century. This article investigates the driving forces behind the recent stages of this development. Focusing on international input—output data from the early 1970s to the 1990s, a decomposition analysis separates the quantitative impacts of demand, technology and trade-driven determinants of output growth. Our findings confirm the rise of knowledge-based services as the most dynamic component, thus strengthening the case for ‘quaternarisation’ as a process which is distinctly characterised by the substantial contribution of technological and organisational change to structural development.
(This abstract was borrowed from another version of this item.)

Suggested Citation

  • Michael Peneder & Serguei Kaniovski & Bernhard Dachs, "undated". "What Follows Tertiarisation? Structural Change and the Role of Knowledge-based Services," WIFO Working Papers 146, WIFO.
  • Handle: RePEc:wfo:wpaper:y:2001:i:146
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://www.wifo.ac.at/wwa/pubid/19827
    File Function: Abstract
    Download Restriction: no

    Other versions of this item:

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Baumol, William J, 1972. "Macroeconomics of Unbalanced Growth: Reply," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 62(1), pages 150-150, March.
    2. Feinstein, Charles, 1999. "Structural Change in the Developed Countries during the Twentieth Century," Oxford Review of Economic Policy, Oxford University Press, vol. 15(4), pages 35-55, Winter.
    3. Jack High (ed.), 2001. "Competition," Books, Edward Elgar Publishing, number 1751.
    4. Baumol, William J & Blackman, Sue Anne Batey & Wolff, Edward N, 1985. "Unbalanced Growth Revisited: Asymptotic Stagnancy and New Evidence," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 75(4), pages 806-817, September.
    5. Gregory Mankiw, 1995. "The Growth of Nations," Brookings Papers on Economic Activity, Economic Studies Program, The Brookings Institution, vol. 26(1, 25th A), pages 275-326.
    6. George J. Stigler, 1951. "The Division of Labor is Limited by the Extent of the Market," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 59, pages 185-185.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:wfo:wpaper:y:2001:i:146. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Ilse Schulz). General contact details of provider: http://edirc.repec.org/data/wifooat.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.