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Structural Change in the Developed Countries during the Twentieth Century

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  • Feinstein, Charles

Abstract

The central theme of this paper is the process of structural change which occurred during the twentieth century in the leading industrial nations. The massive scale of the changes in all these countries is first illustrated by reference to the reallocation of the labour force between agriculture, industry, and the services, and the process of deindustrialization common to all these countries is highlighted. Alternative measures based on output data at current and constant prices are also considered. The paper then explores the main reasons for these shifts in the pattern of activity, looking at the interacting effects of demand- and supply-side factors. This is followed by an examination of some of the consequences of structural change, including the implications for the labour market and the overall growth of labour productivity. The final section speculates briefly about the likely implications for the less-developed countries following behind this advanced group. Copyright 1999 by Oxford University Press.

Suggested Citation

  • Feinstein, Charles, 1999. "Structural Change in the Developed Countries during the Twentieth Century," Oxford Review of Economic Policy, Oxford University Press, vol. 15(4), pages 35-55, Winter.
  • Handle: RePEc:oup:oxford:v:15:y:1999:i:4:p:35-55
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    Cited by:

    1. Beugelsdijk, S. & van Schaik, A.B.T.M., 2002. "Toward a Unified Europe? Explaining Cultural Differences by Economic Development, Cultural Heritage and Historical Shocks," Discussion Paper 2002-103, Tilburg University, Center for Economic Research.
    2. David Card & Richard B. Freeman, 2004. "What Have Two Decades of British Economic Reform Delivered?," NBER Chapters,in: Seeking a Premier Economy: The Economic Effects of British Economic Reforms, 1980-2000, pages 9-62 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    3. Mary Gregory & Giovanni Russo, 2004. "The Employment Impact of Differences in Dmand and Production," DEMPATEM Working Papers wp10, AIAS, Amsterdam Institute for Advanced Labour Studies.
    4. Benjamin N. Dennis & Talan Iscan, 2007. "Accounting for Structural Change: Evidence from Two Centuries of U.S. Data," Department of Economics at Dalhousie University working papers archive account7, Dalhousie, Department of Economics.
    5. Matthias Figo & Peter Mayerhofer, 2015. "Strukturwandel und regionales Wachstum - wissensintensive Unternehmensdienste als Wachstumsmotor?," Working Paper Reihe der AK Wien - Materialien zu Wirtschaft und Gesellschaft 145, Kammer für Arbeiter und Angestellte für Wien, Abteilung Wirtschaftswissenschaft und Statistik.
    6. David Card & Richard B. Freeman, 2002. "What Have Two Decades of British Economic Reform Delivered in Terms of Productivity Growth?," International Productivity Monitor, Centre for the Study of Living Standards, vol. 5, pages 41-52, Fall.
    7. repec:wfo:wstudy:58503 is not listed on IDEAS
    8. Zoya Mladenova, 2005. "XX Century and the Evolution of the Economic Theory (Neoclassical Theory: Development of Microeconomics)," Economic Thought journal, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences - Economic Research Institute, issue 5, pages 3-23.
    9. repec:wfo:monber:y:2017:i:11:p:843-854 is not listed on IDEAS
    10. Sjoerd Beugelsdijk & Ton Van Schaik & Wil Arts, 2006. "Toward a unified Europe? Explaining regional differences in value patterns by economic development, cultural heritage and historical shocks," Regional Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 40(3), pages 317-327.
    11. Elie Gray & André Grimaud & David Le Bris, 2018. "The Farmer, the Blue-collar, and the Monk: Understanding Economic Development through Saturations of Demands and Non-Homothetic Productivity Gains," CESifo Working Paper Series 6970, CESifo Group Munich.
    12. Michael Peneder & Serguei Kaniovski & Bernhard Dachs, 2003. "What follows tertiarisation? structural change and the role of knowledge-based services," The Service Industries Journal, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 23(2), pages 47-66, March.
    13. Dietrich, Andreas & Krüger, Jens J., 2010. "Numerical explorations of the Ngai-Pissarides model of growth and structural change," Darmstadt Discussion Papers in Economics 199, Darmstadt University of Technology, Department of Law and Economics.
    14. repec:wfo:wstudy:33120 is not listed on IDEAS
    15. Gray, Elie & Grimaud, André & Le Bris, David, 2018. "The Farmer, the Blue-collar, and the Monk: Understanding economic development through saturations of demands and non-homothetic productivity gains," TSE Working Papers 18-906, Toulouse School of Economics (TSE).
    16. Dennis, Benjamin N. & Iscan, Talan B., 2007. "Productivity growth and agricultural out-migration in the United States," Structural Change and Economic Dynamics, Elsevier, vol. 18(1), pages 52-74, March.
    17. Shahid Yusuf, 2003. "Globalisation and the Challenge for Developing Countries," Journal of African Economies, Centre for the Study of African Economies (CSAE), vol. 12(Supplemen), pages 35-72, February.

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