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Should Wall-Street be occupied ? an overlooked price externality of financial intermediation

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  • Eden, Maya

Abstract

Does an unregulated financial system absorb too many productive inputs? This paper studies this question in the context of a dynamic model with heterogeneous producers. In the absence of a financial system, the only way to purchase inputs is using internal funds. Producers are subject to idiosyncratic productivity shocks, and will decide to produce only if their productivity is high enough. Otherwise, they will hold money. A financial intermediation technology allows producers to purchase inputs in excess of their internal funds, by borrowing from unproductive agents. However, intermediation requires the use of costly monitoring services. In equilibrium, intermediation increases the money in circulation and raises nominal prices, thereby reducing the value of internal funds and making producers increasingly reliant on costly monitoring services. For this reason, society is better off when intermediation is restricted.

Suggested Citation

  • Eden, Maya, 2012. "Should Wall-Street be occupied ? an overlooked price externality of financial intermediation," Policy Research Working Paper Series 6059, The World Bank.
  • Handle: RePEc:wbk:wbrwps:6059
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    6. Caballero, Ricardo J. & Krishnamurthy, Arvind, 2001. "International and domestic collateral constraints in a model of emerging market crises," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 48(3), pages 513-548, December.
    7. Rajnish Mehra & Facundo Piguillem & Edward C. Prescott, 2011. "Costly financial intermediation in neoclassical growth theory," Quantitative Economics, Econometric Society, pages 1-36.
    8. Jean Arcand & Enrico Berkes & Ugo Panizza, 2015. "Too much finance?," Journal of Economic Growth, Springer, vol. 20(2), pages 105-148, June.
    9. Stockman, Alan C., 1981. "Anticipated inflation and the capital stock in a cash in-advance economy," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 8(3), pages 387-393.
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    Cited by:

    1. Eden, Maya, 2013. "International liquidity rents," Policy Research Working Paper Series 6462, The World Bank.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Economic Theory&Research; Access to Finance; Fiscal&Monetary Policy; Islamic Finance; Markets and Market Access;

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