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Are children driving the gender wage gap? Comparative evidence from Poland and Hungary

Author

Listed:
  • Ewa Cukrowska

    () (Faculty of Economic Sciences, University of Warsaw)

  • Anna Lovasz

    () (Institute of Economics, Centre for Economic and Regional Studies of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences, and Eotvos Lorand University)

Abstract

The paper examines how much children and responsibilities related with them contribute towards the divergence of men’s and women’s wages, and consequently, to the formation of the gender wage gap. To derive the relative contribution of gender specific wage inequalities caused by the parenthood to the overall gender wage gap, we provide a modification of standard Oaxaca-Blinder decomposition method. Contrary to our expectations, the findings show that most of the gender wage inequality is due to the positive wage gap between men who do and do not have children and not due to the wage penalty incurred by mothers.

Suggested Citation

  • Ewa Cukrowska & Anna Lovasz, 2014. "Are children driving the gender wage gap? Comparative evidence from Poland and Hungary," Working Papers 2014-16, Faculty of Economic Sciences, University of Warsaw.
  • Handle: RePEc:war:wpaper:2014-16
    as

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    File URL: http://www.wne.uw.edu.pl/inf/wyd/WP/WNE_WP133.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Gender Wage Gap; Family Gap; Motherhood Penalty; Wage Gap Decomposition;

    JEL classification:

    • J13 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Fertility; Family Planning; Child Care; Children; Youth
    • J22 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Time Allocation and Labor Supply

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