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Regional labour market mobility. A network analysis of inter-firm relatedness

Author

Listed:
  • Shamnaaz B. Sufrauj

    (Department of Economics, University Of Venice CÃ Foscari)

  • Giancarlo Corò

    (Economics, Languages and Entrepreneurship, University Of Venice CÃ Foscari)

  • Mario Volpe

    (Department of Economics, University Of Venice CÃ Foscari)

Abstract

Labour market rigidity is known to hamper the proper adjustment of an economy, thus, making it less resilient to shocks. This paper investigates the characteristics and resilience of the regional labour flow network in Veneto, a region famous for its industrial districts and the expertise of its workforce. A unique database of inter-firm worker mobility is used and the made-in-Italy relatedness to other industries is quantified. Descriptive results suggest that permanent-contract workers are more mobile within-sector than fixed-term contractors. The latter are more mobile across sectors. A finer disaggregation of the made-in-Italy industries shows that textile, food and woodwork are highly related to leisure-retail, logistics-wholesale and agriculture. These results can orient policy-making in getting faster labour reallocation. Network analysis establishes a number of stylised facts about labour flow networks, in particular, a hierarchical organisation of flows and a preference for workers to move from low-connected to high-connected firms and vice-versa, i.e. disassortativity. Unlike previous research, this paper identifies clusters of a non-spatial nature, that are, based on the intensity of labour flows. Regression analysis shows that labour mobility, both in and out, is beneficial for firms. However, being located inside labour clusters negatively affects firm performance. Interestingly, when these clusters include MNEs, they benefit. These results combined suggest that variety of connections prevails over standardisation.

Suggested Citation

  • Shamnaaz B. Sufrauj & Giancarlo Corò & Mario Volpe, 2017. "Regional labour market mobility. A network analysis of inter-firm relatedness," Working Papers 2017:06, Department of Economics, University of Venice "Ca' Foscari".
  • Handle: RePEc:ven:wpaper:2017:06
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Labour mobility; network analysis; skill-relatedness cross-industry linkages;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • J24 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Human Capital; Skills; Occupational Choice; Labor Productivity
    • J62 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Job, Occupational and Intergenerational Mobility; Promotion
    • L14 - Industrial Organization - - Market Structure, Firm Strategy, and Market Performance - - - Transactional Relationships; Contracts and Reputation
    • R23 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - Household Analysis - - - Regional Migration; Regional Labor Markets; Population
    • F23 - International Economics - - International Factor Movements and International Business - - - Multinational Firms; International Business

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