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Regime Switching Stochastic Volatility with Skew, Fat Tails and Leverage using Returns and Realized Volatility Contemporaneously

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  • Trojan, Sebastian

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Abstract

A very general stochastic volatility (SV) model specification with leverage, heavy tails, skew and switching regimes is proposed, using realized volatility (RV) as an auxiliary time series to improve inference on latent volatility. The information content of the range and of implied volatility using the VIX index is also analyzed. Database is the S&P 500 index. Asymmetry in the observation error is modeled by the generalized hyperbolic skew Student-t distribution, whose heavy and light tail enable substantial skewness. Resulting number of regimes and dynamics differ dependent on the auxiliary volatility proxy and are investigated in-sample for the financial crash period 2008/09 in more detail. An out-of-sample study comparing predictive ability of various model variants for a calm and a volatile period yields insights about the gains on forecasting performance from different volatility proxies. Results indicate that including RV or the VIX pays off mostly in more volatile market conditions, whereas in calmer environments SV specifications using no auxiliary series outperform. The range as volatility proxy provides a superior in-sample fit, but its predictive performance is found to be weak.

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  • Trojan, Sebastian, 2013. "Regime Switching Stochastic Volatility with Skew, Fat Tails and Leverage using Returns and Realized Volatility Contemporaneously," Economics Working Paper Series 1341, University of St. Gallen, School of Economics and Political Science, revised Aug 2014.
  • Handle: RePEc:usg:econwp:2013:41
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Stochastic volatility; realized volatility; non-Gaussian and nonlinear state space model; Generalized Hyperbolic skew Student-t distribution; mixing distribution; regime switching; Markov chain Monte Carlo; particle filter;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • C11 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Econometric and Statistical Methods and Methodology: General - - - Bayesian Analysis: General
    • C15 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Econometric and Statistical Methods and Methodology: General - - - Statistical Simulation Methods: General
    • C32 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Multiple or Simultaneous Equation Models; Multiple Variables - - - Time-Series Models; Dynamic Quantile Regressions; Dynamic Treatment Effect Models; Diffusion Processes; State Space Models
    • C58 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Econometric Modeling - - - Financial Econometrics

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