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Indian Economic Growth: Lessons for the Emerging Economies

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  • Suparna Chakraborty

Abstract

Can we use neoclassical growth model to single out the important transmission channels through which external factors or 'primitives' affected the Indian economy and caused the remarkable growth of the period 1982-2002? In this paper, we answer the question by applying the new technique of business cycle accounting to the Indian economy. Our results show us that the primary conduit of policies that brought about significant growth in India was productivity that registered an unprecedented increase particularly in the 1990s.

Suggested Citation

  • Suparna Chakraborty, 2008. "Indian Economic Growth: Lessons for the Emerging Economies," WIDER Working Paper Series RP2008-67, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
  • Handle: RePEc:unu:wpaper:rp2008-67
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    4. Dani Rodrik & Arvind Subramanian, 2005. "From "Hindu Growth" to Productivity Surge: The Mystery of the Indian Growth Transition," IMF Staff Papers, Palgrave Macmillan, vol. 52(2), pages 193-228, September.
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    6. Casey B. Mulligan, 2002. "A Dual Method of Empirically Evaluating Dynamic Competitive Equilibrium Models with Market Distortions, Applied to the Great Depression & World War II," NBER Working Papers 8775, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
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    Cited by:

    1. Suparna Chakraborty & Keisuke Otsu, 2012. "Deconstructing Growth - A Business Cycle Accounting Approach with application to BRICs," Studies in Economics 1212, School of Economics, University of Kent.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Business cycles; Economic development; Convergence (Economics); Productivity; Taxation;

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