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Interprétation d’épisodes historiques à l’aide de modèles dynamiques stochastiques d’équilibre général

  • Franck Portier

[eng] This article surveys recent work on the economic analysis of historical episodes using dynamic stochastic general equilibrium (DSGE) models. We put the methods and challenges of such an approach in perspective. To do so, we present the fundamentals of the methodology and an overview of the studies that adopt this approach. We then focus on a specific episode – the Great Depression in the United States and France – to highlight the advantages and limitations of DSGE models. [fre] Cet article présente les travaux récents d’analyse d’épisodes économiques historiques à l’aide de modèles Dynamiques Stochastiques d’Equilibre Général (DSEG). Nous mettons en perspective les méthodes et enjeux d’une telle démarche. Pour cela, nous présentons les principaux éléments de la méthode, survolons les travaux relevant de cette démarche et discutons d’un épisode particulier, les années trente aux États-Unis et en France. Cette discussion nous permet de présenter les apports et limites de la démarche.

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File URL: http://dx.doi.org/doi:10.3406/ecop.2008.7836
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File URL: http://www.persee.fr/articleAsPDF/ecop_0249-4744_2008_num_185_4_7836/ecop_0249-4744_2008_num_185_4_7836.pdf?mode=light
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Article provided by Programme National Persée in its journal Économie & prévision.

Volume (Year): 185 (2008)
Issue (Month): 4 ()
Pages: 33-46

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Handle: RePEc:prs:ecoprv:ecop_0249-4744_2008_num_185_4_7836
Note: DOI:10.3406/ecop.2008.7836
Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.persee.fr/web/revues/home/prescript/revue/ecop

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  12. Timothy Kehoe & Kim Ruhl, 2003. "Recent great depressions: Aggregate growth in New Zealand and Switzerland, 1973-2000," New Zealand Economic Papers, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 37(1), pages 5-40.
  13. De Vroey Michel R & Pensieroso Luca, 2006. "Real Business Cycle Theory and the Great Depression: The Abandonment of the Abstentionist Viewpoint," The B.E. Journal of Macroeconomics, De Gruyter, vol. 6(1), pages 1-26, November.
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  17. Pedro Amaral & James C. MacGee, 2002. "The Great Depression in Canada and the United States: A Neoclassical Perspective," Review of Economic Dynamics, Elsevier for the Society for Economic Dynamics, vol. 5(1), pages 45-72, January.
  18. Lee E. Ohanian, 2001. "Why Did Productivity Fall So Much during the Great Depression?," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 91(2), pages 34-38, May.
  19. Finn E. Kydland & Carlos E.J.M. Zarazaga, 2001. "Argentina's lost decade," Center for Latin America Working Papers 0401, Federal Reserve Bank of Dallas.
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