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Energy-Saving Technological Change in Japan

  • Takeshi Niizeki
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    The energy-dependence of Japan's economy declined considerably following the first oil crisis in 1973. This paper examines what caused the sharp drop in the use of energy per unit of gross national product (GNP) observed in the 1970s and 1980s, using a simple neo-classical growth model with energy as a third production input. Two possible candidates are investigated: (i) the substitution effect due to changes in the relative price of energy, and (ii) energy-saving technological progress. The findings are as follows. First, the substitution effect alone is weak and alone cannot account for the decline in the energy-GNP ratio. Second, the estimated level of energy-saving technology more than tripled between 1970 and the late 1980s, and the model with energy-saving technological progress is able to explain the drop in the energy-GNP ratio well.

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    File URL: http://gcoe.ier.hit-u.ac.jp/research/discussion/2008/pdf/gd11-218.pdf
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    Paper provided by Institute of Economic Research, Hitotsubashi University in its series Global COE Hi-Stat Discussion Paper Series with number gd11-218.

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    Date of creation: Jan 2012
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    Handle: RePEc:hst:ghsdps:gd11-218
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    1. Adrian Peralta-Alva & Sami Alpanda, 2004. "Oil Crisis, Energy-Saving Technological Change and the Stock Market Crash of 1973-74," Macroeconomics 0405019, EconWPA.
    2. Kensuke Miyazawa, 2009. "Estimation of the elasticity of substitution between oil and capital," Economics Bulletin, AccessEcon, vol. 29(2), pages 655-660.
    3. Keisuke Otsu, 2007. "A Neoclassical Analysis of the Postwar Japanese Economy," IMES Discussion Paper Series 07-E-01, Institute for Monetary and Economic Studies, Bank of Japan.
    4. Keiichiro Kobayashi & Masaru Inaba, 2005. "Business Cycle Accounting for the Japanese Economy," Discussion papers 05023, Research Institute of Economy, Trade and Industry (RIETI).
    5. Kaiji Chen & Ayse Imrohoroglu & Selo Imrohoroglu, 2005. "Japanese Saving Rate," Macroeconomics 0502017, EconWPA.
    6. Hassler, John & Krusell, Per & Olovsson, Conny, 2012. "Energy-Saving Technical Change," CEPR Discussion Papers 9177, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    7. Morrison, C. J. & Berndt, E. R., 1981. "Short-run labor productivity in a dynamic model," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 16(3), pages 339-365, August.
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