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A Neoclassical Analysis of the Postwar Japanese Economy

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  • Otsu Keisuke

    () (Sophia University)

Abstract

Two key features of the postwar Japanese economy are the rapid economic growth during the 1960's and early 70's and the decline in labor supply during the rapid growth period. Taking the capital stock destruction and total factor productivity (TFP) as given, a standard neoclassical optimal growth model can account for the growth patterns of postwar Japanese capital stock, output, consumption, and investment. The decline in labor during the rapid growth period can be attributed to an income effect that occurs as household consumption rises above its subsistence level in this period.

Suggested Citation

  • Otsu Keisuke, 2009. "A Neoclassical Analysis of the Postwar Japanese Economy," The B.E. Journal of Macroeconomics, De Gruyter, vol. 9(1), pages 1-30, May.
  • Handle: RePEc:bpj:bejmac:v:9:y:2009:i:1:n:20
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Ippei Fujiwara & Keisuke Otsu & Masashi Saito, 2008. "The Global Impact of Chinese Growth," IMES Discussion Paper Series 08-E-22, Institute for Monetary and Economic Studies, Bank of Japan.
    2. Ko, Jun-Hyung, 2011. "Has the Government Lowered the Hours Worked? Evidence from Japan," MPRA Paper 30058, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    3. Aoki, Shuhei, 2011. "A Model of Technology Transfer in Japan's Rapid Economic Growth Period," IIR Working Paper 11-05, Institute of Innovation Research, Hitotsubashi University.
    4. Niizeki Takeshi, 2014. "Capacity utilization and the effects of energy price increases in Japan," The B.E. Journal of Macroeconomics, De Gruyter, vol. 14(1), pages 1-26, January.
    5. Daisuke Ikeda & Yasuko Morita, 2016. "The Effects of Barriers to Technology Adoption on Japanese Prewar and Postwar Economic Growth," IMES Discussion Paper Series 16-E-01, Institute for Monetary and Economic Studies, Bank of Japan.
    6. Shuhei Aoki & Julen Esteban-Pretel & Tetsuji Okazaki & Yasuyuki Sawada, 2009. "The Role of the Government in Facilitating TFP Growth during Japan's Rapid Growth Era," CIRJE F-Series CIRJE-F-622, CIRJE, Faculty of Economics, University of Tokyo.
    7. Takeshi Niizeki, 2012. "Energy-Saving Technological Change in Japan," Global COE Hi-Stat Discussion Paper Series gd11-218, Institute of Economic Research, Hitotsubashi University.
    8. Keisuke Otsu & Katsuyuki Shibayama, 2016. "Population Aging and Potential Growth in Asia," Asian Development Review, MIT Press, vol. 33(2), pages 56-73, September.
    9. Keisuke Otsu & Katsuyuki Shibayama, 2018. "Population Aging, Government Policy and the Postwar Japanese Economy," Studies in Economics 1809, School of Economics, University of Kent.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • E13 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - General Aggregative Models - - - Neoclassical
    • O40 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Growth and Aggregate Productivity - - - General

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