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Modern industrial policy in Latin America: Lessons from cluster development policies

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  • Pietrobelli, Carlo

    () (UNU-MERIT, and University of Roma Tre)

Abstract

Industrial clusters have developed in many regions and countries of Latin America. Active public policies have often supported them at the national (federal) and local levels, sometimes with the financial and technical assistance of international organizations. These experiences have been most remarkable, and share several elements of the 'modern' industrial policies that enjoy an increasing consensus in the literature. The vast experience of locally based forms of active policies that have proliferated in Latin America reflects a modern approach to industrial policies, and an example for other developing countries. Such approach has typically included clever interactions of private and government sectors, a process of search and discovery of the necessary public policy inputs, and an interactive design and implementation of these policies.

Suggested Citation

  • Pietrobelli, Carlo, 2019. "Modern industrial policy in Latin America: Lessons from cluster development policies," MERIT Working Papers 031, United Nations University - Maastricht Economic and Social Research Institute on Innovation and Technology (MERIT).
  • Handle: RePEc:unm:unumer:2019031
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    File URL: https://www.merit.unu.edu/publications/wppdf/2019/wp2019-031.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Industrial policy; innovation policy; innovation and learning; cluster development; industrial clusters;

    JEL classification:

    • O25 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Development Planning and Policy - - - Industrial Policy
    • O43 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Growth and Aggregate Productivity - - - Institutions and Growth
    • L14 - Industrial Organization - - Market Structure, Firm Strategy, and Market Performance - - - Transactional Relationships; Contracts and Reputation

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