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Transnational corruption and innovation in transition economies

Author

Listed:
  • Habiyaremye, Alexis

    () (Antalya International University)

  • Raymond, Wladimir

    () (Institut National de la Statistique et des Etudes Economiques (STATEC), Luxembourg)

Abstract

In this paper, we examine how transnational corruption affects host country firms' innovation behaviour and performance in transition economies of Eastern Europe and Central and Western Asia. Using firm-level data from the Business Environment and Enterprise Performance Survey, we show that the involvement of foreign firms in corruption practices reduces the propensity of firms in host countries to invest in research and development and harms their ability to improve their existing products and services. Using a simultaneousequations recursive model and controlling for various innovation determinants, we also show that the reduction in innovation effort ultimately also hurts the host country's long-term ability to successfully bring new products on the market through indirect effects.

Suggested Citation

  • Habiyaremye, Alexis & Raymond, Wladimir, 2013. "Transnational corruption and innovation in transition economies," MERIT Working Papers 050, United Nations University - Maastricht Economic and Social Research Institute on Innovation and Technology (MERIT).
  • Handle: RePEc:unm:unumer:2013050
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    File URL: https://www.merit.unu.edu/publications/wppdf/2013/wp2013-050.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Micheline Goedhuys & Pierre Mohnen & Tamer Taha, 2016. "Corruption, innovation and firm growth: firm-level evidence from Egypt and Tunisia," Eurasian Business Review, Springer;Eurasia Business and Economics Society, vol. 6(3), pages 299-322, December.
    2. Shouro Dasgupta & Enrica De Cian & Elena Verdolini, 2016. "The political economy of energy innovation," WIDER Working Paper Series 017, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
    3. Loredana Fattorini & Mahdi Ghodsi & Richard Grieveson & Sandra M. Leitner & Armando Rungi, 2017. "Monthly Report No. 9/2017," wiiw Monthly Reports 2017-09, The Vienna Institute for International Economic Studies, wiiw.
    4. Valerija Botrić & Ljiljana Božić, 2015. "Innovators' vs Non-innovators' perceptions of corruption in European post-transition economies," International Journal of Business and Economic Sciences Applied Research (IJBESAR), Eastern Macedonia and Thrace Institute of Technology (EMATTECH), Kavala, Greece, vol. 8(3), pages 47-58, December.
    5. Berulava, George & Gogokhia, Teimuraz, 2016. "Studying Complementarities between Modes of Innovation Strategies in Transition Economies," MPRA Paper 71277, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    6. repec:eee:jcecon:v:45:y:2017:i:3:p:498-519 is not listed on IDEAS

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Transnational corruption; Innovation; Transition Economies;

    JEL classification:

    • H42 - Public Economics - - Publicly Provided Goods - - - Publicly Provided Private Goods
    • H57 - Public Economics - - National Government Expenditures and Related Policies - - - Procurement
    • L26 - Industrial Organization - - Firm Objectives, Organization, and Behavior - - - Entrepreneurship
    • O31 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Innovation; Research and Development; Technological Change; Intellectual Property Rights - - - Innovation and Invention: Processes and Incentives
    • O32 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Innovation; Research and Development; Technological Change; Intellectual Property Rights - - - Management of Technological Innovation and R&D
    • P37 - Economic Systems - - Socialist Institutions and Their Transitions - - - Legal

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