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New products and corruption: evidence from Indian firms

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Abstract

It has been shown that corruption has a negative effect on firm productivity, but what about its impact on product innovation? We find that corruption, functioning as a bribe tax, diminishes the probability of new product introduction. We use a World Bank Enterprise Survey from India in 2005, with 1600 firms answering if they introduced a new product to the firm and on the average quantity of bribe paid by firms. Controlling for innovation determinants, firm characteristics, location choice, multi-product firms and other business environment variables, sector-location bribe averages have a negative and significant impact on product innovation

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  • Felipe Starosta de Waldemar, 2011. "New products and corruption: evidence from Indian firms," Documents de travail du Centre d'Economie de la Sorbonne 11033, Université Panthéon-Sorbonne (Paris 1), Centre d'Economie de la Sorbonne.
  • Handle: RePEc:mse:cesdoc:11033
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    1. repec:eee:jcecon:v:45:y:2017:i:3:p:498-519 is not listed on IDEAS
    2. Stefan Borsky & Esther Blanco, 2014. "Setting one voluntary standard in a heterogeneous Europe - EMAS, corruption and stringency of environmental regulations," Working Papers 2014-29, Faculty of Economics and Statistics, University of Innsbruck.
    3. Nguyen, Ngoc Anh & Doan, Quang Hung & Nguyen, Ngoc Minh & Tran-Nam, Binh, 2016. "The impact of petty corruption on firm innovation in Vietnam," MPRA Paper 71902, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    4. Micheline Goedhuys & Pierre Mohnen & Tamer Taha, 2016. "Corruption, innovation and firm growth: firm-level evidence from Egypt and Tunisia," Eurasian Business Review, Springer;Eurasia Business and Economics Society, vol. 6(3), pages 299-322, December.
    5. Valerija Botrić & Ljiljana Božić, 2015. "Innovators' vs Non-innovators' perceptions of corruption in European post-transition economies," International Journal of Business and Economic Sciences Applied Research (IJBESAR), Eastern Macedonia and Thrace Institute of Technology (EMATTECH), Kavala, Greece, vol. 8(3), pages 47-58, December.
    6. DeMaria, Federica & Franco, Chiara & Solferino, Nazaria, 2015. "Corruption and innovation: the mediating role of trade," AICCON Working Papers 139-2015, Associazione Italiana per la Cultura della Cooperazione e del Non Profit.
    7. Sdiri, Hanen & Ayadi, Mohamed, 2016. "Does innovation foster or mitigate the corruption obstacle? Firm-level evidence from Tunisia," MPRA Paper 71088, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    8. Habiyaremye, Alexis & Raymond, Wladimir, 2013. "Transnational corruption and innovation in transition economies," MERIT Working Papers 050, United Nations University - Maastricht Economic and Social Research Institute on Innovation and Technology (MERIT).

    More about this item

    Keywords

    innovation; corruption; firm performance;

    JEL classification:

    • O31 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Innovation; Research and Development; Technological Change; Intellectual Property Rights - - - Innovation and Invention: Processes and Incentives
    • D73 - Microeconomics - - Analysis of Collective Decision-Making - - - Bureaucracy; Administrative Processes in Public Organizations; Corruption
    • L25 - Industrial Organization - - Firm Objectives, Organization, and Behavior - - - Firm Performance

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