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The Importance of Intrinsic and Extrinsic Motivation for Measuring IQ

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  • Borghans, Lex

    () (Maastricht University)

  • Meijers, Huub

    () (Maastricht University)

  • ter Weel, Bas

    () (SEO Amsterdam)

Abstract

This research provides an economic model of the way people behave during an IQ test. We distinguish a technology that describes how time investment improves performance from preferences that determine how much time people invest in each question. We disentangle these two elements empirically using data from a laboratory experiment. The main findings is that both intrinsic (questions that people like to work on) and extrinsic motivation (incentive payments) increase time investments and as a result performance. The presence of incentive payments seems to be more important than the size of the reward. Intrinsic and extrinsic motivation turn out to be complements.

Suggested Citation

  • Borghans, Lex & Meijers, Huub & ter Weel, Bas, 2013. "The Importance of Intrinsic and Extrinsic Motivation for Measuring IQ," IZA Discussion Papers 7182, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
  • Handle: RePEc:iza:izadps:dp7182
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Banuri, Sheheryar & Keefer, Philip, 2016. "Pro-social motivation, effort and the call to public service," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 83(C), pages 139-164.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    cognitive test scores; incentives;

    JEL classification:

    • J20 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - General
    • J24 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Human Capital; Skills; Occupational Choice; Labor Productivity

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