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The Efficiency Implications of Using Proportional Evaluations to Shape the Teaching Workforce

We examine the efficiency implications of imposing proportionality in teacher evaluation systems. Proportional evaluations force comparisons to be between equally-circumstanced teachers. We contrast proportional evaluations with global evaluations, which compare teachers to each other regardless of teaching circumstance. We consider a policy where administrators use the ratings from the evaluation system to help shape the teaching workforce, and define efficiency in terms of student achievement. Our analysis indicates that proportionality can be imposed in teacher evaluation systems without efficiency costs under a wide range of evaluation and estimation conditions. Proportionality is efficiency-enhancing in some cases. These findings are notable given that proportional teacher evaluations offer a number of other policy benefits.

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File URL: http://economics.missouri.edu/working-papers/2014/WP1402_koedel.pdf
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Paper provided by Department of Economics, University of Missouri in its series Working Papers with number 1402.

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Length: 43 pgs.
Date of creation: 09 Jan 2014
Date of revision: 16 Mar 2015
Handle: RePEc:umc:wpaper:1402
Contact details of provider: Postal: 118 Professional Building, Columbia, MO 65211
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Fax: (573) 882-2697
Web page: http://economics.missouri.edu/

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  1. Gadi Barlevy & Derek Neal, 2012. "Pay for Percentile," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 102(5), pages 1805-31, August.
  2. Jason A. Grissom & Lael R. Keiser, 2011. "A supervisor like me: Race, representation, and the satisfaction and turnover decisions of public sector employees," Journal of Policy Analysis and Management, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 30(3), pages 557-580, 06.
  3. Cory Koedel & Jason A. Grissom & Shawn Ni & Michael Podgursky, 2011. "Pension-Induced Rigidities in the Labor Market for School Leaders," Working Papers 1115, Department of Economics, University of Missouri.
  4. repec:mpr:mprres:7330 is not listed on IDEAS
  5. Dan Goldhaber & Duncan Chaplin, 2012. "Assessing the Rothstein Test: Does It Really Show Teacher Value-Added Models Are Biased?," Mathematica Policy Research Reports 77f489fc94a34a0e96a42c419, Mathematica Policy Research.
  6. Donald Boyd & Hamilton Lankford & Susanna Loeb & James Wyckoff, 2012. "Measuring Test Measurement Error: A General Approach," NBER Working Papers 18010, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  7. Donald Boyd & Hamilton Lankford & Susanna Loeb & James Wyckoff, 2005. "The draw of home: How teachers' preferences for proximity disadvantage urban schools," Journal of Policy Analysis and Management, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 24(1), pages 113-132.
  8. repec:mpr:mprres:7942 is not listed on IDEAS
  9. Cory Koedel & Julian Betts, 2009. "Does Student Sorting Invalidate Value-Added Models of Teacher Effectiveness? An Extended Analysis of the Rothstein Critique," Working Papers 0902, Department of Economics, University of Missouri.
  10. Cory Koedel & Mark Ehlert & Eric Parsons & Michael Podgursky & P. Brett Xiang, 2014. "Selecting Growth Measures for School and Teacher Evaluations," Working Papers 1401, Department of Economics, University of Missouri.
  11. Stacy, Brian & Guarino, Cassandra & Reckase, Mark D. & Wooldridge, Jeffrey M., 2013. "Does the Precision and Stability of Value-Added Estimates of Teacher Performance Depend on the Types of Students They Serve?," IZA Discussion Papers 7676, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  12. Kane, Thomas J. & Rockoff, Jonah E. & Staiger, Douglas O., 2008. "What does certification tell us about teacher effectiveness? Evidence from New York City," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 27(6), pages 615-631, December.
  13. Eric A. Hanushek & Steven G. Rivkin, 2010. "Generalizations about Using Value-Added Measures of Teacher Quality," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 100(2), pages 267-71, May.
  14. Matthew Ronfeldt & Hamilton Lankford & Susanna Loeb & James Wyckoff, 2011. "How Teacher Turnover Harms Student Achievement," NBER Working Papers 17176, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  15. Schotter, Andrew & Weigelt, Keith, 1990. "Asymmetric Tournaments, Equal Opportunity Laws And Affirmative Action: Some Experimental Result," Working Papers 90-14, C.V. Starr Center for Applied Economics, New York University.
  16. Raj Chetty & John N. Friedman & Jonah E. Rockoff, 2011. "The Long-Term Impacts of Teachers: Teacher Value-Added and Student Outcomes in Adulthood," NBER Working Papers 17699, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  17. Thomas S. Dee, 2001. "Teachers, Race and Student Achievement in a Randomized Experiment," NBER Working Papers 8432, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  18. Cory Koedel & Rebecca Leatherman & Eric Parsons, 2012. "Test Measurement Error and Inference from Value-Added Models," Working Papers 1201, Department of Economics, University of Missouri.
  19. Sass, Tim R. & Semykina, Anastasia & Harris, Douglas N., 2014. "Value-added models and the measurement of teacher productivity," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 38(C), pages 9-23.
  20. Eric Isenberg & Jeffrey Max & Philip Gleason & Liz Potamites & Robert Santillano & Heinrich Hock & Michael Hansen, 2013. "Access to Effective Teaching for Disadvantaged Students," Mathematica Policy Research Reports ad54d58020e54294b0ab88ad0, Mathematica Policy Research.
  21. Thomas Dee & James Wyckoff, 2013. "Incentives, Selection, and Teacher Performance: Evidence from IMPACT," NBER Working Papers 19529, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  22. repec:mpr:mprres:7943 is not listed on IDEAS
  23. Cory Koedel & Julian Betts, 2007. "Re-Examining the Role of Teacher Quality In the Educational Production Function," Working Papers 0708, Department of Economics, University of Missouri.
  24. Douglas O. Staiger & Jonah E. Rockoff, 2010. "Searching for Effective Teachers with Imperfect Information," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 24(3), pages 97-118, Summer.
  25. Sass, Tim R. & Hannaway, Jane & Xu, Zeyu & Figlio, David N. & Feng, Li, 2012. "Value added of teachers in high-poverty schools and lower poverty schools," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 72(2), pages 104-122.
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