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Pollution, Endogenous Capital Depreciation, and Growth Dynamics

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  • Verónica ACURIO VASCONEZ
  • David DESMARCHELIER
  • Romain RESTOUT

Abstract

This paper documents a positive and significant relationship between carbon dioxide emissions and capital depreciation rate for a large sample covering more than 80 countries in recent decades. Using this result, we develop a simple Solow model with an AK production function in which a pollution externality, viewed as a stock, increases the capital depreciation rate. In the long run, it appears that whatever the magnitude of the pollution effect on capital depreciation, there is no room for endogenous growth despite the AK technology. Moreover, we observe that a sufficiently sensitive capital depreciation rate to pollution can lead to the emergence of a limit cycle near the steady state (i.e., a Hopf bifurcation), indicating that the relationship empirically documented within this paper acts as a destabilizing force for the economy.

Suggested Citation

  • Verónica ACURIO VASCONEZ & David DESMARCHELIER & Romain RESTOUT, 2024. "Pollution, Endogenous Capital Depreciation, and Growth Dynamics," Working Papers of BETA 2024-01, Bureau d'Economie Théorique et Appliquée, UDS, Strasbourg.
  • Handle: RePEc:ulp:sbbeta:2024-01
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Endogenous Capital Depreciation; Growth Model; Pollution.;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • E22 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Consumption, Saving, Production, Employment, and Investment - - - Investment; Capital; Intangible Capital; Capacity
    • O41 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Growth and Aggregate Productivity - - - One, Two, and Multisector Growth Models
    • O44 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Growth and Aggregate Productivity - - - Environment and Growth
    • Q56 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Environmental Economics - - - Environment and Development; Environment and Trade; Sustainability; Environmental Accounts and Accounting; Environmental Equity; Population Growth

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