IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/p/udc/wpaper/wp370.html
   My bibliography  Save this paper

Female Labor Supply and Child Care Supply in Chile

Author

Listed:
  • Dante Contreras
  • Esteban Puentes
  • David Bravo

Abstract

We use a specially designed survey to evaluate the effect of several public policies on female labor force participation in Chile. First, we estimate a self-selection model to find the determinants of female labor participation and wages. Our participation estimates show that schooling is highly positively correlated with participation and being married or having a partner is negatively correlated with participation. Also, we found that having a daycare center close to either their home or place of work and that the center’s hours of operation match labor hours are positively correlated with participation. We simulate changes in these two variables: closeness and compatible hours, which can be subject to public intervention, and evaluate the effect on labor participation, poverty, household income and income inequality. All these policies have a positive impact on labor force participation, which could increase by eight percentage points. The per capita income of these women’s households increases by and 8%, however there is almost no effect on poverty and inequality since most of the women who benefit from these policies come from middle class households.

Suggested Citation

  • Dante Contreras & Esteban Puentes & David Bravo, 2012. "Female Labor Supply and Child Care Supply in Chile," Working Papers wp370, University of Chile, Department of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:udc:wpaper:wp370
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://www.econ.uchile.cl/uploads/publicacion/93fc99073cf6830a16930b85e473c49df8b0d854.pdf
    Download Restriction: no

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Berlinski, Samuel & Galiani, Sebastian, 2007. "The effect of a large expansion of pre-primary school facilities on preschool attendance and maternal employment," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 14(3), pages 665-680, June.
    2. Michael Baker & Jonathan Gruber & Kevin Milligan, 2008. "Universal Child Care, Maternal Labor Supply, and Family Well-Being," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 116(4), pages 709-745, August.
    3. James Heckman & Flavio Cunha, 2007. "The Technology of Skill Formation," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 97(2), pages 31-47, May.
    4. Killingsworth, Mark R. & Heckman, James J., 1987. "Female labor supply: A survey," Handbook of Labor Economics,in: O. Ashenfelter & R. Layard (ed.), Handbook of Labor Economics, edition 1, volume 1, chapter 2, pages 103-204 Elsevier.
    5. Elizabeth Cascio, 2006. "Public Preschool and Maternal Labor Supply: Evidence from the Introduction of Kindergartens into American Public Schools," NBER Working Papers 12179, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    6. E. Paul Durrenberger, 2005. "Labour," Chapters,in: A Handbook of Economic Anthropology, chapter 8 Edward Elgar Publishing.
    7. Dante Contreras & Gonzalo Plaza, 2010. "Cultural Factors in Women's Labor Force Participation in Chile," Feminist Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 16(2), pages 27-46.
    8. Jere R. Behrman & Yingmei Cheng & Petra E. Todd, 2004. "Evaluating Preschool Programs When Length of Exposure to the Program Varies: A Nonparametric Approach," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 86(1), pages 108-132, February.
    9. Jenny Encina & Claudia Martínez, 2009. "Efecto de una mayor cobertura de salas cuna en la participación laboral femenina: evidencia de Chile," Working Papers wp303, University of Chile, Department of Economics.
    10. Dante Contreras & Esteban Puentes & David Bravo, 2005. "Female labour force participation in greater santiago, Chile: 1957-1997. A synthetic cohort analysis," Journal of International Development, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 17(2), pages 169-186.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. repec:oup:wbecrv:v:31:y:2017:i:3:p:747-766. is not listed on IDEAS
    2. Verónica Alaimo & Mariano Bosch & David S. Kaplan & Carmen Pagés & Laura Ripani, 2015. "Jobs for Growth," IDB Publications (Books), Inter-American Development Bank, number 90977, February.
    3. Miguel Jaramillo-Baanante, 2017. "Fertility and women’s work in a demographic transition: evidence from Peru," Working Papers 2017-90, Peruvian Economic Association.
    4. Dante Contreras & Paulina Sepúlveda, 2017. "Effect of Lengthening the School Day on Mother's Labor Supply," World Bank Economic Review, World Bank Group, vol. 31(3), pages 747-766.
    5. Daniela Del Boca, 2015. "Child Care Arrangements and Labor Supply," IDB Publications (Working Papers) 88074, Inter-American Development Bank.
    6. World Bank, 2011. "Work and Family : Latin American and Caribbean Women in Search of a New Balance
      [Trabajo & familia : mujeres de América Latina y el Caribe en busca de un nuevo equilibrio - Resumen ejecuivo (Vol. 2
      ," World Bank Other Operational Studies 12489, The World Bank.
    7. Juan Carlos, Campaña & J. Ignacio, Giménez-Nadal & Jose Alberto, Molina, 2017. "Differences between self-employed and employed mothers in balancing family and work responsibilities: Evidence from Latin American countries," MPRA Paper 77964, University Library of Munich, Germany.

    More about this item

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:udc:wpaper:wp370. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Mohit Karnani). General contact details of provider: http://edirc.repec.org/data/deuclcl.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.