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Female labour force participation in greater santiago, Chile: 1957-1997. A synthetic cohort analysis

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  • Dante Contreras

    (Department of Economics, Universidad de Chile, Chile)

  • Esteban Puentes

    (Department of Economics, The University of Chicago, USA)

  • David Bravo

    (Department of Economics, Universidad de Chile, Chile)

Abstract

By using a synthetic cohort methodology, this paper contributes to the analysis of the evolution of female labour force participation in Chile over the last forty years. We decompose the participation rate in terms of age, year and cohort effects. The results of the estimations show that the age effect significantly explains the participation rate. Cohort variables are also important, enabling us to identify cohort effects associated with both, the number of children and the level of schooling of the group. In turn, contemporary variables are relevant, in particular the cyclical component. All this indicates that the changes in the participation rate may be due in the first place to increases in the number of women in the age groups where the participation rate is higher. Secondly, the increase in the participation rate is due to effects that are associated with different behaviours in the succeeding cohorts of women; and, finally, contemporary variables seemingly have very small importance. Copyright © 2005 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Suggested Citation

  • Dante Contreras & Esteban Puentes & David Bravo, 2005. "Female labour force participation in greater santiago, Chile: 1957-1997. A synthetic cohort analysis," Journal of International Development, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 17(2), pages 169-186.
  • Handle: RePEc:wly:jintdv:v:17:y:2005:i:2:p:169-186
    DOI: 10.1002/jid.1161
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Osvaldo Larrañaga & Ricardo Paredes, 1999. "Unemployment and Wages in Chile: A Dynamic Perspective Using Synthetic Cohorts," Latin American Journal of Economics-formerly Cuadernos de Economía, Instituto de Economía. Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile., vol. 36(109), pages 929-946.
    2. Killingsworth, Mark R. & Heckman, James J., 1987. "Female labor supply: A survey," Handbook of Labor Economics,in: O. Ashenfelter & R. Layard (ed.), Handbook of Labor Economics, edition 1, volume 1, chapter 2, pages 103-204 Elsevier.
    3. Luis Rubalcava & Dante Contreras, 2000. "Does Gender and Birth Order Matter when Parents Specialize in Child’s Nutrition? Evidence from Chile," Journal of Applied Economics, Universidad del CEMA, vol. 3, pages 353-386, November.
    4. Lehrer, Evelyn L, 1989. "Preschoolers with Working Mothers: An Analysis of the Determinants of Child Care Arrangements," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 1(4), pages 251-268.
    5. Eugenia Muchnik & Isabel Vial & Andreas Strüver & Bettina Harbart, 1991. "Oferta de Trabajo Femenino en Santiago," Latin American Journal of Economics-formerly Cuadernos de Economía, Instituto de Economía. Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile., vol. 28(85), pages 463-490.
    6. Evelyn L. Lehrer, 1992. "The Impact of Children on Married Women's Labor Supply: Black-White Differentials Revisited," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 27(3), pages 422-444.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. David Bravo & Dante Contreras & Sergio Urzúa, 2002. "Poverty and Inequality in Chile 1990-1998: Learning from Microeconomic Simulations," Working Papers wp198, University of Chile, Department of Economics.
    2. Ximena Quintanilla, 2011. "Did Chileans Maximize Pensions when Choosing between PAYG and DC?," Working Papers 46, Superintendencia de Pensiones, revised Sep 2011.
    3. Hanan Nazier & Racha Ramadan, 2016. "Women's Participation in Labor Market in Egypt: Constraints and Opportunities," Working Papers 999, Economic Research Forum, revised May 2016.
    4. Dante Contreras & Esteban Puentes & David Bravo, 2012. "Female Labor Supply and Child Care Supply in Chile," Working Papers wp370, University of Chile, Department of Economics.

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