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An Error Correction Factor Model of Term Structure Slopes in International Swaps Markets

The first two principal components in the vector of term structure slopes from IRS markets in eight major currencies can be approximately identified as the slopes for the US dollar and Deutsche mark. Each of the eight slopes considered is cointegrated with these two factors. The implied Error Correction models can be very fruitful for short and medium term slope forecasting for the eight currencies. This scheme achieves a drastic reduction of dimensionality, since the eight slopes can be predicted using just univariate forecasts for the two factors. Adding more factors to the model does not lead to a significant improvement in forecasting performance, while forecasts obtained using just one factor are not as good as those from two-factor Error Correction models.

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Paper provided by Universidad Complutense de Madrid, Facultad de Ciencias Económicas y Empresariales, Instituto Complutense de Análisis Económico in its series Documentos de Trabajo del ICAE with number 0222.

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Length: pages 19
Date of creation: 2002
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:ucm:doicae:0222
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  1. Arturo Estrella & Frederic S. Mishkin, 1996. "Predicting U.S. recessions: financial variables as leading indicators," Research Paper 9609, Federal Reserve Bank of New York.
  2. Hardouvelis, Gikas A, 1988. " The Predictive Power of the Term Structure during Recent Monetary Regimes," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 43(2), pages 339-56, June.
  3. Geert Bekaert & Robert J. Hodrick & David A. Marshall, 1996. "On Biases in Tests of the Expecations Hypothesis of the Term Structure Of Interest Rates," NBER Technical Working Papers 0191, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
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  6. Arturo Estrella & Gikas A. Hardouvelis, 1989. "The term structure as a predictor of real economic activity," Research Paper 8907, Federal Reserve Bank of New York.
  7. Engsted, Tom & Tanggaard, Carsten, 1994. "Cointegration and the US term structure," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 18(1), pages 167-181, January.
  8. Knez, Peter J & Litterman, Robert & Scheinkman, Jose Alexandre, 1994. " Explorations into Factors Explaining Money Market Returns," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 49(5), pages 1861-82, December.
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  12. Tom Engsted & Ken Nyholm, 2000. "Regime shifts in the Danish term structure of interest rates," Empirical Economics, Springer, vol. 25(1), pages 1-13.
  13. Zuliu Hu, 1993. "The Yield Curve and Real Activity," IMF Staff Papers, Palgrave Macmillan, vol. 40(4), pages 781-806, December.
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