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Child and Household Deprivation: A Relationship beyond Household Socio-Demographic Characteristics

Author

Listed:
  • Bárcena, Elena

    (Universidad de Málaga.)

  • Blázquez, Maite

    () (Departamento de Análisis Económico (Teoría e Historia Económica). Universidad Autónoma de Madrid.)

  • Budría, Santiago

    (ICADE, CEEAplA and IZA.)

  • Moro, Ana Isabel

    (Universidad de Granada.)

Abstract

As recession and financial crisis spread across Europe an increasing number of people are at risk of poverty and social exclusion. Children are more exposed to the risk of poverty and social exclusion than the overall population of the EU. The current climate of economic downturn calls out for an urgent need to break the vicious circle of intergenerational transmission of poverty and social exclusion in order to improve the well-being of children in a systematic and integrated way. Using the EU-SILC 2009 module on deprivation, this paper aims to contribute to the literature on poverty and social exclusion by analysing the determinants of material deprivation among children. Special attention is given to the type of household children belong to, a characteristic that is strongly determined by adults’ behaviour. We find that the level of child deprivation varies among household types. Moreover, we confirm that even after controlling for the socio-economic characteristics of the household and parents, there still exist households with a lack of certain items that are strongly correlated to children with intense deprivation. Therefore, we can conclude that there exists an association between child deprivation and the household-deprivation profile that surpasses the socio-demographic characteristics of the household and parents.

Suggested Citation

  • Bárcena, Elena & Blázquez, Maite & Budría, Santiago & Moro, Ana Isabel, 2014. "Child and Household Deprivation: A Relationship beyond Household Socio-Demographic Characteristics," Working Papers in Economic Theory 2014/07, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid (Spain), Department of Economic Analysis (Economic Theory and Economic History).
  • Handle: RePEc:uam:wpaper:201407
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Child deprivation; household deprivation; social exclusion; multilevel models.;

    JEL classification:

    • I32 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Welfare, Well-Being, and Poverty - - - Measurement and Analysis of Poverty
    • J13 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Fertility; Family Planning; Child Care; Children; Youth

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