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Estimating a Search and Matching Model of the Aggregate Labor Market in Japan

  • Ching-Yang Lin

    (Graduate School of International Relations, International University of Japan)

  • Hiroaki Miyamoto

    (Graduate School of International Relations, International University of Japan)

This paper studies how well a search and matching model can describe aggregate Japanese labor market dynamics in a full information setting. We develop a discrete- time search and matching model with productivity and separation shocks and use it as a data-generating process for our empirical analysis. Using Bayesian methods, we estimate the model for data on unemployment and vacancy postings in Japan. We Â…nd that the model is successful in matching the volatility in unemployment and vacancies while it does not match the volatility of output and wages. We also Â…nd that both productivity and separation shocks contribute to movements in unemployment and vacancies, but productivity shocks more so.

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File URL: http://www.cirje.e.u-tokyo.ac.jp/research/dp/2012/2012cf850.pdf
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Paper provided by CIRJE, Faculty of Economics, University of Tokyo in its series CIRJE F-Series with number CIRJE-F-850.

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Length: 22 pages
Date of creation: Apr 2012
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:tky:fseres:2012cf850
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  1. Christopher A. Pissarides & Barbara Petrongolo, 2001. "Looking into the Black Box: A Survey of the Matching Function," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 39(2), pages 390-431, June.
  2. Marcus Hagedorn & Iourii Manovskii, 2008. "The Cyclical Behavior of Equilibrium Unemployment and Vacancies Revisited," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 98(4), pages 1692-1706, September.
  3. Fujita, Shigeru & Ramey, Garey, 2007. "Job matching and propagation," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 31(11), pages 3671-3698, November.
  4. Miyamoto, Hiroaki, 2011. "Cyclical behavior of unemployment and job vacancies in Japan," Japan and the World Economy, Elsevier, vol. 23(3), pages 214-225.
  5. An, Sungbae & Schorfheide, Frank, 2005. "Bayesian Analysis of DSGE Models," CEPR Discussion Papers 5207, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  6. John P. Martin, 1998. "What Works Among Active Labour Market Policies: Evidence From OECD Countries' Experiences," OECD Labour Market and Social Policy Occasional Papers 35, OECD Publishing.
  7. Ching-Yang Lin & Hiroaki Miyamoto, 2010. "Gross Worker Flows and Unemployment Dynamics in Japan," Working Papers EMS_2010_07, Research Institute, International University of Japan.
  8. Shigeru Fujita & Garey Ramey, 2012. "Exogenous versus Endogenous Separation," American Economic Journal: Macroeconomics, American Economic Association, vol. 4(4), pages 68-93, October.
  9. Ellen R. McGrattan & Patrick J. Kehoe & V. V. Chari, 2008. "New Keynesian models: not yet useful for policy analysis," Working Papers 664, Federal Reserve Bank of Minneapolis.
  10. Julen ESTEBAN-PRETEL & NAKAJIMA Ryo & TANAKA Ryuichi, 2011. "Japan's Labor Market Cyclicality and the Volatility Puzzle," Discussion papers 11040, Research Institute of Economy, Trade and Industry (RIETI).
  11. Andreas Hornstein & Per Krusell & Giovanni L. Violante, 2005. "Unemployment and vacancy fluctuations in the matching model: inspecting the mechanism," Economic Quarterly, Federal Reserve Bank of Richmond, issue Sum, pages 19-50.
  12. Krause, Michael U. & Lubik, Thomas A., 2007. "The (ir)relevance of real wage rigidity in the New Keynesian model with search frictions," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 54(3), pages 706-727, April.
  13. Thomas A. Lubik, 2011. "Aggregate labor market dynamics in Hong Kong," Working Paper 11-02, Federal Reserve Bank of Richmond.
  14. Sungbae An & Frank Schorfheide, 2007. "Bayesian Analysis of DSGE Models—Rejoinder," Econometric Reviews, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 26(2-4), pages 211-219.
  15. Robert E. Hall, 2005. "Employment Fluctuations with Equilibrium Wage Stickiness," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 95(1), pages 50-65, March.
  16. Christopher A. Pissarides, 2000. "Equilibrium Unemployment Theory, 2nd Edition," MIT Press Books, The MIT Press, edition 1, volume 1, number 0262161877, June.
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